DAISHOWA & the LUBICONS


Lubicon Lake Indian Nation
Little Buffalo Lake, AB
403-629-3945
FAX: 403-629-3939

Mailing address:
3536 - 106 Street
Edmonton, AB T6J 1A4
403-436-5652
FAX: 403-437-0719



August 22, 1991



Enclosed for your information is a copy of a newspaper article on the situation with Daishowa and the Lubicons. The article appeared in the Peace River Record-Gazette. Peace River is of course the small northern Alberta town now dominated by the huge Daishowa pulp mill.



The article contains both creative license with the Lennarson quotes and at least two factual errors. The creative license is instructive but is essentially unimportant. The factual errors require correction in a newspaper article being circulated for information by the Lubicon people.



The first factual error is in quoting Lennarson as saying that "There was an agreement struck between the Lubicon Lake Band and Daishowa in December of 1988." In fact the agreement between Daishowa and the Lubicons was made on March 07, 1988.



The second factual error is in quoting Lennarson as saying that "Daishowa had agreed not to log in the disputed (Lubicon) territory until the fall of 1989". In fact the agreement between Daishowa and the Lubicons provided that Daishowa would not try to log in the unceded Lubicon territory until there'd been a satisfactory settlement of Lubicon land rights negotiated between the Lubicon people and the Government of Canada, and then an additional agreement negotiated between Daishowa and the Lubicon people regarding Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns.


Re-printed from the Peace River RECORD-GAZETTE, August 14, 1991



LOBBY GROUPS THREATEN DAISHOWA BOYCOTT IN EUROPE



By Barb Toker

Record-Gazette Staff

*EDMONTON



A meeting of representatives from over 100 organizations across Europe and North America has resulted in plans for increased lobbying against the use of Daishowa produced products in countries represented at the gathering.



The boycott was proposed after participants to the 7th European Meeting of North American Indian Support Groups unanimously passed a resolution calling on the pulp and paper company to halt logging operations on land claimed by the Lubicon Lake Indian Band of Little Buffalo.



According to Band advisor Fred Lennarson, Daishowa had come to an agreement with the Lubicon Lake Band to "stay out" of the area the Band claimed was part of their traditional territory.



"There was an agreement struck between the Lubicon Lake Band and Daishowa in Dec. of 1988," Lennarson said, "Daishowa has since been slip-sliding all over the place."



Lennarson says Daishowa had agreed not to log in the disputed territory until the fall of 1989, but has since purchased a company that is logging in the area.



Wayne Crouse of the Peace River Pulp Mill says Daishowa is owner of Brewster Construction, a firm which he saws has logged the area in question for about 13 years.



"The pulp mill itself is not doing any logging on the east side of the river this year," Crouse said, "The only logging that would be taking place...would be done by Brewster Construction."



Crouse says that while Daishowa did meet with Lubicon Band representatives, no formal agreement resulted from the discussions.



"There was not a formal agreement as such," Crouse said, "There wasn't an agreement for any prescribed period of time."



Crouse says Daishowa officials made it clear that the company would eventually make use of the timber of stocks.



"We always said that there was going to come a time, business-wise, that we would have to go ahead (with logging in the area)," Crouse said.



Lennarson says efforts will be made to convince customers of Daishowa paper products to halt purchases unless the company ceases logging of the disputed territory. He points to European newspapers as Daishowa customers and says protesters will put pressure on those publications.



"We're just as serious about stopping them as they are about going ahead," Lennarson said.



Crouse says the situation has been magnified.



"The perception is that there is some massive amount of logging," Crouse said, and points out that in the land designated by the Alberta government as a possible reserve no logging activity exists.



As for the European protests, Crouse said, "I don't think they understand the situation very well in Canada."