The Daishowa Boycott


Lubicon Lake Indian Nation
Little Buffalo Lake, AB
403-629-3945
FAX: 403-629-3939

Mailing address:
3536 - 106 Street
Edmonton, AB T6J 1A4
403-436-5652
FAX: 403-437-0719



January 13, 1992



A major international campaign is well under way to block Daishowa from clear-cutting unceded Lubicon territory until there's at least a settlement of Lubicon land rights and a harvesting agreement negotiated with the Lubicon people respecting Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. Enclosed for your information are copies of press statements, media coverage, correspondence and other related materials.



In addition to the primarily Canadian activities described in the enclosed materials, the Lubicon office in Edmonton has received reports of growing support in Japan, a second major demonstration in Australia and actions of various kinds planned for cities across Europe during the last week of January. Taken together these activities are clearly having an impact upon Daishowa and both levels of Canadian Government. Daishowa is no longer simply insisting upon its supposed "right" to clear-cut Lubicon trees. And both levels of Canadian Government are alternately attacking the Lubicons and hinting at possible settlement flexibility.



A Canadian boycott of Daishowa paper products is centered largely in Toronto, Edmonton and Calgary but is rapidly spreading across the country. 10,000 copies of boycott materials prepared by Edmonton boycott organizers have already been distributed and over 100,000 more have been requested by people wishing to support the boycott.



Two offices in Tokyo are reportedly working around the clock to organize what is being described as the first major boycott of a Japanese company by Japanese people.



The latest demonstration in Australia took place on December 15th at Daishowa's woodchip mill in Eden, New South Wales. It was organized by a variety of groups including the Wilderness Society and Greenpeace.



During the Australian demonstration a parameter fence was breached, a tall tower scaled and a 45 foot banner unfurled reading "DAISHOWA: THE NAME BEHIND GLOBAL FOREST DESTRUCTION". A speaker from the Canberra Branch of the Wilderness Society deplored Daishowa's proposed clear-cutting of unceded Lubicon land, condemned the underhanded tactics being employed against the Lubicons and demanded immediate recognition and respect for Lubicon land rights. There were reportedly a number of arrests.



In Dusseldorf on January 27th there will be a press conference at City Hall and demonstrations at the offices of Daishowa/Marubeni and the Canadian Consulate General. Faced with the growing international furore Marubeni has now backed out of negotiations to purchase Daishowa's Peace River Pulp Mill but is still involved with Daishowa in other ventures. Participating organizations in the Dusseldorf demonstrations include Greenpeace, BUND, the Society for Endangered Peoples, the Big Mountain Action Group (BMAG), the Belgium-based Coordinated Indigenous Affairs Working Groups (KWIA), the Luxembourg-based Iwerliewen and the Innu Support Group from the Netherlands. Following the demonstrations there will be informational workshops involving the participating organizations and representatives of the German Green Party.



On January 28th there will be a demonstration at the office of the Canadian Consulate General in Brussels as well as at the Belgium subsidiary of the German Feldmuhle Corporation. The Feldmuhle Corporation is a major Daishowa customer in Europe. The demonstrations in Belgium are being organized by KWIA. (KWIA will also continue their related lobbying efforts at the European Parliament.)



On January 29th there will be demonstrations at the Canadian Consulate General in Munich organized by the BMAG, the Munich Society for Endangered Peoples and the Institute for Applied Ecology, Action and Anthropology (INFOE).



On January 30th there will be a demonstration in Berlin at the office of the Canadian Consulate General organized by the Association for the Support of North American Indians and Greenpeace.



On January 31st there will be a demonstration at the Japanese Embassy in Vienna as well as demonstrations at the offices of Canadian Consulate Generals in both Bern and Vienna. The Bern demonstration is being organized by Incomindios. The Vienna demonstrations are being organized by the Working Circle for North American Indians (AKIN) and the Austrian Society for Endangered Peoples. (AKIN has also planned a number of "public events" for the third week of January to publicize the plight of the Lubicon.)



Additionally during the last week of January there will be a demonstration at the Canadian High Commission in London organized by Catholic Action for Native America (CAFNA), and 1,000 letters from concerned Europeans will be presented to Daishowa officials by the coalition of concerned church and human rights groups who organized last September's demonstration in Vancouver.



Daishowa has responded to all of the above in two ways, one clearly calculated to preserve maximum Daishowa prerogative and the other intended to try and erode Lubicon support -- especially in Alberta.



First Daishowa has now announced that they'll agree to stay out of the unceded Lubicon territory but only this year, coming up in typical Daishowa fashion with a continually changing reason why they can't simply make a commitment to stay out of the unceded Lubicon territory until there's a settlement of Lubicon land rights and an agreement negotiated with the Lubicon people regarding Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. Most recently Daishowa Vice President Tom Hamaoka told the Editorial Board of the Edmonton Journal that "Daishowa can't make a commitment never to log Lubicon lands because the size of the land remains unclear". That's of course demonstrably untrue but telling the truth has never been Mr. Hamaoka's long suit. Rather Daishowa's objective is clearly to try and convince people to drop the stop Daishowa campaign while at the same time avoiding a public commitment which would make it difficult for Daishowa to move in and clear-cut Lubicon trees just as soon as the pressure's off. The real message for people concerned over the plight of the Lubicon is thus to keep up the pressure until there's either a settlement and harvesting agreement, or until Daishowa publicly agrees to stay out of unceded Lubicon territory pending a settlement and harvesting agreement.



Secondly Daishowa has cancelled their 700 million dollar expansion plan originally scheduled for 1993 and has warned that the stop Daishowa campaign threatens not only Daishowa but development activity in Northern Alberta generally. This is of course only a variant of the "take-our-marbles-and-go-home-if-you're-not-nice-to-us" tactic that Daishowa tried unsuccessfully to pull on Edmonton Mayor Jan Reimer last October. Hopefully Albertans will see this thinly veiled threat for what it is and will again forcefully reject the "development-at-any-cost" philosophy it represents. Selling off the natural resources of the Province for a pittance and polluting the hell out of the environment will of course remain an option for Albertans whether or not Daishowa chooses to shut down its 600 million dollar bleached kraft pulp mill and go home.


Attachment #1: November 6, 1991, letter from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) to Daishowa Vice-President Tom Hamaoka



Dear Mr. Hamaoka:



We are both well aware that your corporation is initiating a potentially disastrous confrontation with the Lubicon Lake Cree Nation in the woods of northern Alberta. It is fully within your power to stop this from happening. We are writing to you today to inform you of our intentions vis-a-vis this impending crisis.



Friends of the Lubicon draws on a network of many community, church, labour, human rights and other organizations, all of whom are making common cause with the Lubicon Lake Nation and pressing for a settlement of their aboriginal land rights. You are no doubt well aware that there is a vast amount of support for the Lubicon people across Canada and a growing concern about the activities of Daishowa. While you were willing to honour the March 7, 1988, agreement with the Lubicon Nation not to log in their territories until a settlement of their land rights was in place, we kept our energies directed at the federal government's refusal to resolve Lubicon land rights. However you have flagrantly broken the terms of that agreement by planning the clear-cutting of Lubicon territories through your subsidiary Brewster Construction, making you into an active agent in the destruction of the Lubicon peoples land and future.



We expect from you a clear, firm and public commitment not to cut and not to purchase any wood cut on unceded Lubicon territory until after a settlement of Lubicon land rights and negotiation of a harvesting agreement with the Lubicon people that takes into account Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. Until such time we are initiating a public boycott campaign of Daishowa products.



This campaign will encompass all Daishowa products which reach the public, including all paper products and chip board. We are currently negotiating with many of your clients who have shown an interest in the Lubicon Nation's concerns and are reconsidering their contracts with Daishowa.



The Lubicon Nation and its supporters are not new to boycotts. Many scoffed when the Nation announced its boycott of the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary and its flagship arts exhibit "The Spirit Sings". However these same people stopped laughing when the boycott became a massive public issue, sending Olympic PR experts into a frenzy of denial, cover-up and damage control. They weren't laughing when the Glenbow's exhibit was crippled by the refusal of major artifacts from museums around the world in support of the Lubicons.



Union Oil underestimated the strength of the Lubicon Nation and their supporters in 1985 when they planned an unauthorized pipeline through unceded Lubicon territories. But faced with immense public pressure at every level and an obvious confrontation brewing on the ground, Union Oil reconsidered their plans and made the responsible move of agreeing to consult the Nation on development projects in the area.



There is no need for Daishowa to go through the kind of public ordeal you are heading for. Now is the time for a clear public commitment from Daishowa. Otherwise we will have no choice but to mobilize our membership to the utmost of our capabilities. We will expect your response promptly.


Attachment #2: November 8, 1991, letter to Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) from James P. Morrison, Daishowa Canada



Dear Mr. Thomas:



This is in reply to your letter to Mr. Tom Hamaoka dated November 6, 1991. In recent weeks, Daishowa Canada has been attempting to dispel the negative effects of some of the misleading reports published in the press. Therefore, we have attached for your perusal, a copy of Daishowa Canada's position paper which outlines the Company's efforts respecting the Lubicon situation.



You may not be aware that Daishowa Canada (and its subsidiaries) have elected to avoid the area of concern to the Lubicons this winter. Also, Chief Bernard Ominayak and the Hon. Tom Siddon, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, met recently in Edmonton in an effort to identify a means to resume their negotiations. We are very encouraged by this development and we believe that our actions and sensitivity have played a part in establishing an appropriate climate for both the Lubicons and the Federal Government to resolve their dispute.



We would encourage you to join us in urging both the Federal Government and the Lubicons to resolve their dispute as soon as possible.



*************************************************************



November, 1991, DAISHOWA CANADA position paper



The position of Daishowa canada Co. Ltd. with respect to the Lubicon situation is as follows:



1. While Daishowa Canada deeply regrets this land claim dispute, we cannot resolve it. This matter must be resolved by both levels of government and the Lubicons. Daishowa Canada has publicly and privately urged these parties to work towards resolving their differences. Recently, the Federal Government and the Lubicons have had discussions that may lead to a resumption of their negotiations.



2. Daishowa Canada negotiated a Forest Management Agreement (FMA) with the Alberta Government in good faith. The FMA describes the obligations and responsibilities Daishowa Canada must satisfy to establish, grow and harvest timber within the defined FMA area. Specified areas have been excluded from the FMA area to accommodate a future reserve for the Lubicon Band. Logging activities are not, of course, permitted within these areas. To date, Daishowa Canada, Peace River Pulp Division has not commenced its own FMA operations in the area of concern to the Lubicons.



3. Daishowa Canada, Peace River Pulp Division, has purchased and is legally obligated to purchase incidental aspen from independent sawmillers, farmers and loggers who have their own permits or quotas, and salvage aspen from other industrial activities, within the FMA area. This year, Daishowa Canada has stated that it will not purchase incidental or salvage aspen if it is logged in the area of concern to the Lubicons.



4. Brewster Construction Ltd. was acquired in October of 1989 and subsequently became a subsidiary of Daishowa Canada. This sawmill has been in existence for 14 years, and prior to being acquired by Daishowa Canada, it was harvesting its timber quotas without incident or confrontation. While all of Brewster's timber quotas are outside the specified reserve area for the Lubicon Band, some quota areas have always been in the Lubicon's area of concern. Last year, recognizing the sensitivity of the situation, Brewster modified its logging plans in the hope that talks would be restarted to resolve this matter. This year, to again demonstrate its sensitivity, Brewster will not harvest timber in the area of concern to the Lubicons.



5. Daishowa Canada has endeavoured to keep the Lubicons informed about our operations and plans, and to avoid confrontations or challenges through the media. Our recent meetings and communications with the Lubicons have indicated that they acknowledge and appreciate our efforts to avoid their area of concern this year. This is an important step towards renewing their negotiations with the Federal Government, and resolving this dispute as expeditiously as possible.


Attachment #3: November 10, 1991, letter from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) to Tom Hamaoka in response to November 8th letter from Morrison



Dear Mr. Hamaoka:



We are in receipt of Mr. James P. Morrison's letter dated November 8, 1991, with the attached five-point "position paper" via fax. We appreciate the speedy reply.



Unfortunately, the matter is not resolved as of yet. In particular we have three main points which need to be clarified before we will consider disengaging our public action campaign.



1.) In your point number 3, you make note of a legal obligation to purchase incidental aspen from independent sawmillers, farmers and loggers who have their own permits and quotas, and salvage aspen from other industrial activities, within the FMA area. If you are indeed legally obligated to do so, doesn't this contradict your promise not to accept this aspen? What is the province's position on this matter?



As people who have monitored your company's activities over the last few years, we haven't forgotten the artful tap-dance between Daishowa and the province of Alberta last winter when Daishowa first pushed forward its plans to break their March 7, 1988, agreement with the Lubicon Nation by beginning logging operations on unceded Lubicon territories. Faced with a possible confrontation on the ground and growing public outrage, Daishowa suggested on October 5, 1990, that they were abandoning logging plans for the winter, a decision which had to be approved by provincial Forestry Minister LeRoy Fjordbotten and premier Don Getty. The provincial end of this 'good-cop-bad-cop' combination refused to give Daishowa sub-contractors alternate sites for logging operations outside of unceded Lubicon traditional territories; so, on November 19, 1990, while Fjordbotten was saying that Daishowa subsidiary Brewster Construction would NOT be logging in "the area of concern", Brewster was ALREADY clear-cutting spruce and aspen in unceded Lubicon territories. In fact Buchanan Lumber Ltd. had been working on roads in the Lubicon area as early as October 29, having been "given the go-ahead" by provincial Forestry officials. On November 14 Buchanan was actively logging and Brewster had bulldozed a couple of logging roads on Chief Bernard Ominayak's trapline east of Bison Lake.



2.) The "area of concern to the Lubicons" you refer to throughout the document is never clearly defined. We are concerned with the ambiguity expressed. In fact, the very day you wrote us, the Edmonton Journal reported that Daishowa has been using faulty maps in a related dispute, despite having been provided with clear maps delineating the entire unceded Lubicon traditional territory. Any public commitment made by Daishowa Canada Co. Ltd. must include clear representation of the area covered by the agreement.



3.) Most of the promises made in the enclosed 'position paper' are quite clearly limited to this winter only. Does this mean that, barring a resolution of the Lubicon Lake Nation's land rights with both levels of government in the meantime, we will have to repeat this scenario next year, and the year after that? Our position, as expressed to you in our letter of November 6, 1991, is that we expect Daishowa to make a clear, firm and public commitment to not cut and not to purchase any wood cut on unceded Lubicon territory until AFTER A SETTLEMENT of Lubicon land rights and negotiation of a harvesting agreement with the Lubicon people that takes into account Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. Mr. Hamaoka, principles are not a matter of convenience. This is a matter of the very survival of an aboriginal society and regardless of how long it takes to resolve the land rights of the Lubicon Nation, it is still wrong to clear-cut in their unceded traditional territories before such a settlement is in place. It's wrong today and it will still be wrong tomorrow. If you sincerely wish to see justice done, no other position is tenable.



Your optimism concerning recent discussions with Tom Siddon is astounding. Mr. Siddon did little to justify the opinion that these talks "may lead to a resumption of their negotiations". In fact the meeting between Siddon and Ominayak had no real substance to it. For the record, Mr. Siddon told Edmonton Journal reporters that he was once again dusting off the Federal government's unacceptable "take-it-or-leave-it" offer of January, 1989, minus approximately 40% of the initial offer which has now been promised to the government-created Woodland Cree Band. Perhaps Siddon felt that three years of government-sponsored disruption of Lubicon society would have made them desperate enough to accept a clearly insulting offer. This hardly constitutes a healthy atmosphere for the resumption of negotiations -- if anything it illustrates that the federal government is as low and untrustworthy as ever.



Which brings us to the primary issue at hand: TRUST. On what grounds should we trust another vague statement from Daishowa? In public and private statements over the past year your position has changed frequently and dramatically. For instance:



- On March 7, 1988, at a meeting between Daishowa officials and Lubicon representatives, an agreement was made in front of witnesses that Daishowa would not log on unceded Lubicon traditional territories until a settlement of Lubicon land rights had been reached with both levels of government. Daishowa then moved to break that agreement last winter by commencing logging in unceded Lubicon territory through subsidiaries like Buchanan and Brewster.



- In an April 12, 191, letter to the chairperson of the Toronto-based Task Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility, Daishowa General Manager James P. Morrison claimed that "Daishowa at no time made a commitment to the Lubicon band that involved their traditional territory". He suggested instead that the March 1988 meeting was held to explain to the Nation "the provisions contained in the proposed Forest Management Agreement" (between Daishowa and the Alberta Provincial Government).



- In a meeting held on September 24, 1990, in the Lubicon settlement at Little Buffalo, Wayne Thorp and Tom Hoffman from Daishowa were asked about the agreement. Mr. Thorp said that "Daishowa is respecting that agreement. Daishowa is not logging in the Lubicon area." Stu Dornbierer of Daishowa clarified this position by saying "a distinction has to be made between Daishowa and these logging companies", referring to the Daishowa subsidiaries who were doing the dirty deed. On September 27 Mr. Akidat of Daishowa subsidiary Brewster Construction further mentioned the agreement, claiming that as a recently purchased subsidiary they didn't feel bound by it.



- The next attempt to redefine the agreement came from James Morrison of Daishowa, who said on November 19, 1990, that your agreement with the Lubicons provided only that you would stay out of unceded Lubicon lands until the Grimshaw accord was negotiated. The Grimshaw accord, as you recall, was an agreement on a proposed land base between Alberta Premier Getty and the Lubicon Nation, negotiated in October 1988 after blockades were set up on Lubicon territories. This accord, however, could never have been anticipated in March 1988 when the Daishowa-Lubicon agreement was made. It had never even been proposed.



- Later that same month Mr. Morrison reversed his claim and said for the first time that there had never been an agreement at all. This time he said you had met in March 1988 merely to talk about the state of Lubicon negotiations with the province. This is also noteworthy in that there were no negotiations with the province happening at that time.



- Morrison contradicted himself again by falsely claiming that there was an agreement, but that it only applied to logging in new areas, and that the Lubicons had told Daishowa that Daishowa could continue to log in traditional logging areas. Two days later Daishowa publicly directed Buchanan to continue logging operations, breaking the former myth that Buchanan was an independent operator and thus not subject to the Daishowa agreement.



- Most recently, James Morrison sent a letter on August 22 to a concerned Quebec citizen which resembled the position paper you sent to us. However in that position paper Morrison made it clear that while full-scale clear-cutting operations hadn't proceeded as planned last year, "further delays are no longer possible."



Does Daishowa rely on the short-term memories of the TV generation as a basis of its public policy? Or are you so sure that people won't compare your contradictory public statements that you feel free to change your position at your convenience? I'm sure by now you can see why nothing short of a clear, firm and public commitment of the sort we are demanding is acceptable. Without such a commitment, how can we be sure that Daishowa's position won't change again next week?



As we have stated in the past, until we see the aforementioned firm and public commitment from Daishowa which is acceptable to the Lubicon Nation, we will continue to mount a full-scale challenge to Daishowa's plans through a public boycott and action campaign. No doubt by now you will have heard from several of your many clients who have been contacted by us. Each day we are identifying and approaching new clients who are concerned with the issues being raised here. I believe it is in your best interests to make a commitment as soon as possible. We will look forward to hearing from you.



Sincerely,



Kevin Thomas


Attachment #4: VARSITY NEWS, Tuesday, November 12, 1991



LUBICON CREE FIGHT FOR LAND RIGHTS



By Maylin Scott

Varsity Staff



Torontonians are protesting on Bay Street to show their support for a Cree land claim in northern Alberta.



Ed Bianchi, a member of the Toronto branch of Friends of the Lubicon, said the Lubicon Lake Cree, a First Nation of 507 people, are in danger of losing their land to Daishowa, a transnational paper company, which plans to continue clear-cutting the unceded land of the Lubicon this winter.



"The Lubicon traditional territory is 10,000 square kilometres, which is their traditional hunting and living grounds," he said. "It's their land, because historically, they've never signed any treaty giving it away."



Bianchi said the Alberta government began leasing Lubicon land in 1988 to companies such as Daishowa but shortly after, the Lubicon contested the leasing and are currently trying to negotiate a settlement with the provincial and federal governments.



In the meantime, they struck a deal with Daishowa which promised not to start cutting on the land until the settlement was completed -- a promise Bianchi says has been broken.



"The cutting started last winter and they plan to start again this winter," he said. "Last winter there was one year's worth of cutting. The type of cutting is clearcut, like we've never seen before. They are using machines that cut trees 24 hours a day. They can cut 70 football fields of trees in one day.



"You also have to remember that the Lubicon land has been devastated by provincial oil and gas development in the area. It's devastated the ecology and driven away the wildlife. it's changed their diet. Their staple used to be moose but there's no more moose. The morale in the community has really declined.'



Bianchi said his group is organizing a protest outside the Daishowa head offices at 161 Bay Street this Thursday to pressure the company to keep their promise.



"The Lubicon see this as their last stand," he said. "After the trees are all gone, even if the land is settled, it won't do them any good."



But Michael McCormack, vice-president of administration for Daishowa offices in Toronto, reached at his office in Quebec City, said while all branches are part of the parent company in Japan, the Vancouver branch is handling Lubicon Lake.



"Daishowa has two different corporate entities," he said. "Daishowa Forest Products in our operation in Toronto and it involves the operation of our Quebec mill. The other is Daishowa Canada Corporation in vancouver which is dealing with Alberta.



"They are protesting the wrong company."



But Bianchi disagreed.



"That's a pretty weak PR line," he said. "We're not protesting against the people in the office, but the transnational company. They still belong to the same company."



McCormack said the protest would not accomplish anything.



"From what I've read (Daishowa Canada) are not cutting on their lands," he said. "But we have nothing to do with Lubicon Lake or Alberta management."



Representatives from Daishowa Canada could not be reached for comment.



Bianchi said Friends of the Lubicon has sent a letter to Daishowa to ask them to honour their agreement. If they haven't received an answer by Nov. 25, they are planning a national boycott of Daishowa products and companies that use them. He said fast food chains such as Pizza Pizza, Mr. Submarine, Hoi Chow and Cultures as well as the Ontario Liquor Board use Daishowa products, mostly paper bags.



He said he was optimistic that the campaign would work.



"Anything that we can do that educates people about it helps. Public pressure on government and business is effective if there is enough of it."



He said the Lubicon are asking for a form of self-government and self-determination.



"About ten years ago, they were entirely self-sufficient. After the development started, they were forced to go on welfare. They've gone from 5 percent on welfare ten years ago to 95 percent now. All they want is a chance for Lubicon self-sufficiency."



He said they want 95 square miles to develop game ranching and agriculture, introducing elk and buffalo into the area.



"They are not asking that there be no cutting trees there at all, but are asking to have a say in how the resources are developed, taking into respect their wildlife and ecological needs.



"All they want is what was taken away from them in the first place."



Friends of the Lubicon is a group of twenty active members working with the Lubicon Nation as a liaison and to promote education about native attempts to achieve sovereignty.


Attachment #5: November 20, 1991, letter to Daishowa Canada Vice-President Koichi Kitigawa from Nova Scotia resident Dawn Suzuki



Dear Mr. Kitigawa:



I spoke with you on the phone last month and you requested a letter. Therefore, with heavy heart, I write. Being of Japanese ancestry and third generation Canadian, it is shocking and incomprehensible to me how a company from Japan with its long history of honour and of sacred regard and reverence for nature can break a promise to Chief Ominayak of the Lubicon people made on March 7th, 1988, "that logging would not start until the Lubicon land claim was settled." This is an embarrassment and a dishonour to all Japanese people whether they be in Japan or in Canada. This is unacceptable. I am very proud of my Japanese heritage; of the wealth of wisdom inherent in its sacred view. I am also proud of being a Canadian and of the vast beauty of its "Embattled Gardens" and grateful to the long-suffering aboriginal peoples whose generosity and compassion in welcoming visitors to their land has been returned with ruthlessness. To allow this type of business practice to go on in this land is beneath the dignity of the Canadian Government, Federal and Provincial, to whom the Canadian peoples entrust their collective will. This is not an Eden for the merchants of the marketplace where the almighty buck is king. I would urge you to honour your promise to Chief Ominayak and pull out of Lubicon land claim areas -- even though the Provincial Government seems to be forcing your hand by writing up a contract which requires that you take resources from this land -- no one has the right to harvest the natural resources of a land which rightfully belongs to the Natives.



Apparently there is a double standard being employed in your logging practices here. It is alright to desecrate nature in someone else's land as long as one keeps one's principles pure at home. Japan has "superbly maintained" forests in an industry where selective logging is practiced and where herbicides "are not allowed at all in commercial operations" (Fact Sheet, Friends of the Lubicon). Why not apply your knowledge in sustainable forestry practice to other countries as well? It is quite evident form the latest catastrophe in the Philippines that the type of clearcutting as set out in your lease to cut in Alberta's Wood Buffalo National Park is totally unacceptable. "A World Wildlife Fund Int. report concluded that the Japanese tropical hardwood trade had an impact on the South Pacific environment that was 'largely negative', ignoring good forestry practices 'in favour of wasteful, short-term, extractive practices'" (Fact Sheet, Friends of the Lubicon). That the Alberta Provincial Government would agree to "permission to clear-cut 98% of their lease; permission to clear-cut sections up to 5 km. wide; allowing trees to be cut by streams and riverbanks, which leads to soil erosion; and replanting of cut areas is not a stipulation in the agreement" (Fact Sheet, Friends of the Lubicon) is tragically irresponsible for a government mandated to protect the welfare of its people and the environment in Alberta.



To proceed with such ignorant policies is to do so at great peril and great risk. The land claims situation in Canada is delicate and fragile and protected by the kami of the aboriginal Great Spirit.



Why not work cooperatively with the aboriginal people who have been guardians of this land from time immemorial? There is no doubt that we all would greatly benefit from aboriginal wisdom at this critical point in history. I don't believe we have devolved to the point of whoredom surrendering resources to be raped. I would urge you to sensitize yourselves to the political situation in this country, to align yourselves with the spiritual aspirations throughout the land and particularly to inform yourselves of the nature of the genuine aboriginal grievances and groundswell of environmental concerns and then go forward in helping to cultivate the people in this country in a way that is respectful, dignifying, empowering, beneficial and life-affirming for all. There is no doubt that Canadians would greatly benefit from capital development but this country will not benefit if the development neglects the rights and land claims of the First Nations and ignores the welfare of the environment.



I believe that Japan's continued economic success and prosperity will depend upon the continuing good will of ALL peoples. I appreciate the enormous personal sacrifices that are being made daily by the average Japanese worker in forging the Japanese economy. As Japan looks increasingly outwards, I'm sure she will realize that her suffering neighbours in the USSR are courageously laying the foundations for world peace in a radical way and I hope that Gorbachev's pleas for support will not go unheeded -- our collective peace and welfare very much depend upon the stability and well-being of their country -- we all need to help in "beating swords into ploughshares". Japanese business has the preciously rare opportunity and clout to be heavy-hitters in the cause of human and environmental dignity and integrity which could lead to great joy in fulfilling the current Emperor's mandate which is world peace.



I would urge you to realize that the aboriginal peoples are Canada's First Nations, the land's original guardians. The Indians are, indeed, "in deo"; they are the primus inter pares who are directly related through their heritage to the primum mobile. No one can take that power away from them and it must be respected.


Attachment #6: Transcript of CBC Radio News Broadcast (5:30 P.M.) Friday, November 22, 1991



Kathy Little, CBC News



An Ontario restaurant chain is boycotting the Daishowa paper company to show support for the Lubicon Indians. Cultures Fresh Food has more 60 outlets in Canada. It says it will stop buying paper products made by Daishowa, which operates a huge pulp mill near Peace River. The food company has written a letter of support to a group called Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto). The Band is claiming large areas of land in northwestern Alberta that Daishowa has rights to log. Cultures Fresh Foods says after careful research into the situation it's decided to stop using paper products made by Daishowa. Cultures has 61 soup and sandwich style restaurants in Canada. Most of them are in Ontario. It has 1 outlet in Calgary.


Attachment #7: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Saturday, November 23, 1991



LUBICONS PLAN DAISHOWA BOYCOTT

Band's nationwide plans come as a surprise to company



Paul Marck

Journal Staff Writer



Edmonton



The Lubicon Indian band is organizing a nationwide boycott of Daishowa paper products to support sits bid for a land-claim settlement.



Kevin Thomas of The Friends of the Lubicon, a Toronto-based support groups, said Friday it would announce the boycott at an Assembly of First Nations conference in Ottawa next week.



The conference will include Lubicon chief Bernard Ominayak and First Nations chief Ovide Mercredi.



However, Daishowa Canada vice-president and general manager Tom Hamaoka said the boycott was news to him.



He wants to meet Ominayak before it's officially unveiled Thursday.



Thomas said from Toronto the group sent Hamaoka a letter Nov. 6 asking the Japanese-owned Daishowa to make a clear commitment not to log disputed Lubicon lands until a land-claims settlement is negotiated with the federal government.



"The main thing is to get Daishowa to make a clear, firm public commitment not to log on Lubicon lands," Thomas said.



Daishowa, which has a pulp mill at Peace River and logging rights to the Lubicon lands, has said previously it won't log the disputed area this winter.



However, the company has declined to identify the specific area it will avoid, Thomas said. While the company agreed in March 1988 to keep out of unceded Lubicon lands, the band says smaller sub-contractors have broken terms of that agreement.



Hamaoka said from Vancouver he thought Daishowa had an agreement with the Lubicon.



"I'm somewhat surprised they've taken this step," Hamaoka said. He denied Daishowa is trying to frustrate the Lubicon, saying the company intends to stay out of the "traditional Lubicon area" on the east side of the Peace River.



"I don't know what the confusion is...I will not be purchasing or logging in their sensitive area of concern," he said.



But he plans to try to iron things out next week. "I will definitely endeavor to get hold of Bernard Ominayak. There's a complete misunderstanding here. My intentions are true and honorable."



The 500-member Lubicon band has sought a reserve from the federal and provincial governments at Lubicon Lake, 350 km northwest of Edmonton, for 50 years.



The band has repeatedly turned down the federal government's "final offer" of $45 million and 246 square km of land since it was first made in 1989. The financial interpretation of the offer is in dispute, as well as the amount of land, and the mineral and logging rights in the oil-rich area.



The Friends of the Lubicon is seeking backing from both the 50,000-strong National Association of Japanese Canadians and the 117,000-member Alberta Federation of Labour.



Both organizations intend to put the matter before their executives early next week.



"We're certainly supportive of the Lubicon cause and have been for a number of years," said AFL president Don Aitken.



He expects the boycott will be formally endorsed.



However, the National Association of Japanese Canadians is cautious in its stand on the issue.



Van Hori, a member of the organization's human rights committee, said it is uncertain whether the group, which has chapters in 14 cities including Edmonton, will support the boycott.



"We are sympathetic of the land claims and sympathetic of the fight against Daishowa's clear cutting of Lubicon lands," Hori said from Toronto. Regarding the boycott, Hori said: "We haven't decided yet on that."



The Friends of the Lubicon has formally approached nine restaurant and grocery chains about supporting the boycott.


Attachment #8: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Saturday, November 23, 1991



SO-CALLED FRIENDS OF THE LUBICON TAKING AIM AT PUBLIC OPINION



Rod Ziegler

Business Beat



If a group calling itself Friends of the Lubicon is really serious about starting a national boycott against Daishowa paper products, it should get its facts straight.



JOURNAL reporter Paul Marck quotes Kevin Thomas of the so-called Friends of the Lubicon from Toronto explaining that his group wants Daishowa to make a clear commitment not to log disputed Lubicon lands until a land-claims settlement is negotiated with the federal government.



To that end, the suggestion is that this so-called Friends of the Lubicon group will launch a "Stop the Genocide, Boycott Daishowa" campaign at an Assembly of First Nations conference in Ottawa next Thursday.



I hope not. Call me a Daishowa apologist, call me a Tory lickspittle, call me a racist...call me anything you want, but consider this:



Daishowa Canada's general manager Tom Hamaoka came to Edmonton in early November and, in a speech to the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce, urged Ottawa and Alberta to get the negotiating process going again. He said Daishowa didn't deserve to get squeezed like a watermelon seed. I agree: it's clear that Daishowa is merely the goat you tether if you wish to catch a much bigger tiger.



At a media scrum following Hamaoka's speech, I heard him state clearly that neither Daishowa nor its subsidiary would log on disputed lands in Daishowa's Forest Management Area "this winter".



I later asked why Daishowa couldn't give a longer-term commitment. The answer came back: Daishowa has enough timber-cutting rights -- outside the disputed area -- to last it through this cutting season. Unless it has access to other sources of timber cut next year outside the disputed lands, it won't be able to find feedstock for its Peace River pulp mill.



So, to give the so-called Friends of the Lubicon the ironclad commitment it wants, Daishowa would have to agree to volunteer to be the goat to be tethered to catch the tiger.



It was my understanding that Daishowa and Chief bernard Ominayak had reached a very, very unofficial compromise over how to handle the question of Daishowa's access to lands under dispute. Obviously, if the reports of the proposed Daishowa boycott are true, my information was wrong.



If so, that's too bad. If we're talking boycott here -- in the same way that people talked righteous boycott against Gainer -- then let's talk real, fundamental injustice. If there truly is to be a boycott of Daishowa products, then let's understand that what's involved here is not fundamental justice but sticking the pig that will squeal the loudest, to bring the most pressure on people who, otherwise, would refuse to negotiate further on the Lubicon land claim issue.



Finally, let's talk about the negotiations themselves. They are in stalemate. The Lubicons demand recognition of their aboriginal rights to territory they insist they have never surrendered; compensation for benefits denied to them and for riches drawn from land that still belong to them. A crude estimation of the dollar value of the Lubicons' demands, $170 million.



Ottawa insists that, though Lubicon forebears did not sign Treaty No. 8 in 1899, other aboriginals who shared the area with the Lubicons did. Ottawa says that, yes, it has an obligation to make an agreement with the Lubicon because it agreed to do so before the Second World War but did not do so.



Ottawa says that a fair settlement with the Lubicon would be benefits worth $45 million and a reserve of 246 square km; that, if this is not enough, the Lubicon should fight the offer in the courts.



The Lubicons say they refuse to recognize the white man's system of justice. And, they insist they demand real justice.



Clearly, if these boycott reports are true, then it's clear that the Lubicons and those who advise them, have chosen to appeal to a higher court -- public opinion. I say good luck. Somewhere between Ottawa's offer of $45 million in compensation and your demand of roughly $170 million, there is room for compromise. Unless, of course, you believe there is no honor in compromise.


Attachment #9: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Monday, December 2, 1991, Letter to the Editor from Kevin Thomas, Friends of the Lubicon, Toronto, Ont



DAISHOWA HAS ETHICAL OBLIGATION TO LUBICONS

PERCEIVED INJUSTICE WILL BE FOUGHT



Your columnist got it wrong when he suggested that the Friends of the Lubicon were setting up Daishowa as the goat tethered to catch the tiger (So-Called Friends of the Lubicon taking aim at public opinion, THE JOURNAL, Nov. 23).



Rod Ziegler makes the assumption that Daishowa is somehow an innocent third party stuck in the middle of a dispute between the Lubicons and the federal government.



Daishowa bought leases to cut on unceded Lubicon territories from the provincial government knowing that the title to the land was contested. Perhaps they thought the Lubicons wouldn't be able to mount a challenge to their plans, or perhaps that the situation would be resolved before they began operations; either way, their actions have shown that they are far from innocent.



Despite having made an agreement on March 7, 1988, with the Lubicons not to cut on unceded Lubicon lands until a settlement of their land rights had been negotiated, Daishowa has claimed that this agreement didn't exist, or that it did exist but it didn't apply to their subsidiaries, that it exists but they only agreed to hold off until the Grimshaw accord was negotiated in late 1988.



The issue is this: Daishowa has plans to clearcut vast sections of unceded aboriginal land and is unwilling to make the clear ethical decision to hold off operations until the Lubicon Lake Cree land rights are settled. This clearcutting operation will destroy what little is left of the Lubicon people's lands and society. There will be nothing left to negotiate if Daishowa is allowed to go ahead. That is fundamental injustice and we are going to fight like hell to make sure it doesn't happen.


Attachment #10: THE TORONTO STAR, Tuesday, November 26, 1991



ONTARIO FIRMS START BOYCOTT TO BACK LUBICON LAND CLAIM



By George Oake

Toronto Star

EDMONTON



Two Ontario companies are boycotting Daishowa Canada Ltd. to show support for the Lubicon Indian land dispute in northern Alberta.



The two firms are Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants, a Toronto-based chain of 61 shops in Canada, and Knechtel Wholesale Grocers of Kitchener, Ont.



They have written to the Friends of the Lubicon, a Toronto-based support group of the Alberta Indians, saying they'll no longer deal with the Japanese-owned forest products company.



"After careful research into the current situation in Alberta, Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants has decided to stop using Daishowa products," wrote Cultures executive Michael Washinushi in a letter to Friends of the Lubicon.



Frank Rooke, buyer for Knechtel Corp., took a similar position yesterday in a letter to Friends of the Lubicon, which is organizing the boycott.



"I have had time to read both sides of the problem and I have to side with the Friends of the Lubicon," Rooke wrote.



"Japan carefully manages their forests using selective logging, while the Japanese-owned Daishowa company is seemingly allowing clear-cutting in Alberta on Lubicon land."



Ho-Lee-Chow Restaurants, a Toronto-based chain of 23 restaurants, already has stopped dealing with Daishowa.



Operations manager Paul Coffey said many of the company's employees are sympathetic with the plight of the Lubicon.



"I would have felt very uncomfortable dealing with a company like that, but we had already made a move away from them," he told The Star yesterday.



Daishowa Canada President Tom Hamaoka, reached at his Vancouver office yesterday, said he was dismayed by the boycott.



Hamaoka added his company had agreed not to log on the disputed lands this winter, while urging provincial and federal governments to settle the 50-year old dispute.



"Maybe they're trying to put pressure on Daishowa to get a settlement with government," Hamaoka suggested in a telephone interview from Vancouver.



"Unfortunately, we have nothing to negotiate."



Daishowa Canada Ltd. has logging rights in a 29,0000-square-kilometre (11,200-square-mile) area, some of which is on disputed Lubicon land northwest of Edmonton.



The 500-member Lubicon band has tried to negotiate a reserve from federal and provincial governments for more than 50 years.



In 1989, Ottawa offered $45 million and 246 square kilometres (95 square miles) of land. The Lubicon want $170 million and iron-clad guarantees of mineral rights in the oil-rich lands.



Band members have taken their case to the United nations as well as staged demonstrations in Europe and Japan to publicize their case.



Daishowa was caught in the crossfire after it negotiated a deal with the Alberta government for forest rights in the mid-eighties.



The Lubicon felt they were left out of the agreement that concerned their disputed land.



Now the Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon say Daishowa's commitment to forego logging on the disputed lands for one winter is not good enough.



Kevin Thomas, a spokesperson for the Friends of the Lubicon, said the company had reneged on a previous commitment to stay out of disputed lands until a deal was forged.


Attachment #11: THE TORONTO STAR, Sunday, December 22, 1991, Letter to the Editor from Kevin Thomas, Friends of the Lubicon, Toronto, ONT



A STRANGE DEFINITION OF INNOCENCE



Tom Hamaoka, vice-president of Daishowa Canada Ltd., seems to think he can play innocent victim in our current campaign in support of the Lubicon Lake Nation's land rights. On Nov. 26, The Star quoted Hamaoka saying, "Maybe they're trying to put pressure on Daishowa to get a settlement with government."



The Friends of the Lubicon are organizing a boycott of Daishowa for the simple and obvious fact...that Daishowa's plans to clear-cut unceded Lubicon lands in northern Alberta are a direct threat to the very survival of this aboriginal community. Period.



Daishowa bought leases to cut on unceded Lubicon territories from the provincial government knowing full well that the province's title to the land was contested.



Then, despite having made an agreement on March 7, 1988, with the Lubicon Nation not to cut on unceded Lubicon lands until a settlement of their land rights had been negotiated, Daishowa broke the agreement, alternately claiming that this agreement didn't exist, or that it did exist but it didn't apply to their subsidiaries, that it exists but that they only agreed to hold off until the (totally unrelated) Grimshaw accord was negotiated in late 1988, ad infinitum.



Daishowa has plans to clear-cut vast sections of unceded aboriginal land and is unwilling to make the clear ethical decision to hold off operations until a land rights settlement has been reached between the Lubicon Lake Nation and both levels of government.



This vast clear-cutting operation will destroy what little is left of the Lubicon people's lands and society. There will be nothing left to negotiate over if Daishowa is allowed to go ahead.



If that's the position of an "innocent third party" then Hamaoka has a strange definition of innocence.


Attachment #12: November 27, 1991, letter from Native Women's Association of Canada to Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)



RE: "STOP THE GENOCIDE -- BOYCOTT DAISHOWA"



On behalf of the Native Women's Association of Canada, I would like to confirm our support to the Lubicon Lake Cree Nation in the Daishowa Boycott.



The Native Women's Association of Canada has always extended their support for the Lubicon people in their struggle to regain title to their traditional territory.



The Native Women's Association of Canada will send a message to its members and all aboriginal/non-aboriginal people to boycott Daishowa Products because of their plan to clear cut the land and destroy the Lubicon Lake community and the Lubicon Lake Cree Nation. The NWAC condemns this environmental destruction to our precious Mother Earth.



Sincerely, Gail Stacey Moore, Speaker


Attachment #13: Transcript of CBC Radio News Broadcast (7:30 A.M.) Thursday, November 28, 1991



CBC News



The Lubicon Indians and Canada's largest Indian group, the Assembly of First Nations, are announcing a boycott of the Daishowa Paper Company. Daishowa operates a pulp mill near Peace River. The Alberta Government has given the company rights to cut timber on land the Lubicon Indians say is their historical hunting grounds. The Lubicons are threatening to boycott any company that uses paper products made by Daishowa. The boycott is being organized by the Lubicon support group in Toronto called Friends of the Lubicon. Last week an Ontario chain of restaurants announced it wasn't buying any more paper supplies from Daishowa. CBC News has learned that another restaurant will join the boycott along with the YWCA in Toronto and an Ontario grocery company. The official announcement will be made in Ottawa in a few hours.


Attachment #14: November 28, 1991, Press Release from National Association of Japanese Canadians



Delivered by Sachiko Okuda, Chair, NAJC Human Rights Committee



The National Association of Japanese Canadians (NAJC) lends its support to the boycott of Daishowa paper products coordinated by the Friends of the Lubicon.



The NAJC is the body which, in September of 1988, was successful in obtaining redress for Japanese Canadians from the federal government. As an organization with a strong human rights orientation, the NAJC is committed to collective action for a better Canada and a world free from racism, poverty and inequality.



The purpose of the boycott announced today is to obtain from Daishowa a public and clear commitment that it and its subsidiaries will immediately cease clear cutting operations and any plans to commence such operations on unceded Lubicon territory.



This position reflects the grave concern that the NAJC has over the environmental consequences that such clear cutting operations represent. But of even greater importance is the concern of the NAJC about the long-term, destructive effects that such action will have on the Lubicons themselves, and their very existence as a people.



The NAJC registers its strong opposition to the unyielding position taken by both the Alberta and federal governments in their negotiations with the Lubicon nation over the land in dispute. We urge the Alberta and federal governments to resume, without delay, negotiations with the Lubicon nation and to work with the Lubicons for the resolution of their land claim.


Attachment #15: Transcript of CBC Radio News Broadcast (12:30 P.M.) Thursday, November 28, 1991



Phil Henry, CBC News



The Lubicon Indians of northern Alberta are taking their land claim struggle to the streets of Toronto. In Ottawa today a coalition of Lubicon support groups announced a boycott of the giant Pizza Pizza chain. Pizza Pizza uses paper products made by Daishowa, the forestry company the Lubicons say plans to clear-cut their forests. Rick Grant has the story.



Rick Grant, CBC, Ottawa



The Lubicons have been trying for years to get Ottawa and Alberta to agree to a reserve. The Lubicons also claim control over thousands of hectares of forest. So far nothing has worked. But three years ago the Lubicon got agreement with the Japanese forestry firm Daishowa not to log on land claimed by the Indians. Chief Bernard Ominayak says that Daishowa has broken that agreement now and is clear-cutting his land. Ominayak says the boycott of Daishowa products is designed to stop the company from logging, but also to force government to return to the bargaining table.



Chief Bernard Ominayak, Lubicon Lake Indian Nation



We cannot afford to sit back and watch everybody steal our resources while governments benefit from those resources and our people are forced onto welfare.



Grant



And Ominayak has the support of the Assembly of First Nations. The National Chief, Ovide Mercredi, is promising a national campaign of Native civil disobedience if negotiations don't resume.



National Chief Ovide Mercredi, Assembly of First Nations



It doesn't have to be that if the government listens. But the problem is your governments are not listening.



Grant



Mercredi wouldn't reveal details of the national campaign but said there would be no violence under any circumstances and no damage to private property. Rick Grant, CBC News, Ottawa.


Attachment #16: THE EDMONTON SUN, Friday, November 29, 1991



NATIVES TARGET PIZZA COMPANY



OTTAWA:



A national boycott of a massive Japanese corporation and an Ontario pizza chain was launched yesterday in support of Alberta's Lubicon Cree.



The campaign was sprung by the Assembly of First Nations, the National Association of Japanese Canadians, the Aboriginal Rights Coalition of church groups and the Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicons.



The boycott is aimed at preventing paper products giant Daishowa Canada from logging any of the 10,000 sq. km. of territory claimed by the Lubicons as traditional land until the band wins a settlement.



The coalition wants businesses to stop buying Daishowa paper products.



Yesterday it urged a boycott against Ontario's 230-outlet Pizza Pizza chain, which refused to cancel its contract for small paper bags.



Pizza Pizza's executive director Lorne Austin said he was "totally shocked" by the boycott call.


Attachment #17: THE TORONTO STAR, Friday, November 29, 1991



LUBICON STRUGGLE SPARKS BOYCOTT CALL OF METRO PIZZA CHAIN



By William Walker

Toronto Star

OTTAWA



A Toronto-based lobby group is asking Metro residents to boycott Pizza Pizza outlets this weekend if they sympathize with the plight of Alberta's Lubicon Cree.



The move is part of a new political strategy by the Lubicon to stop clear-cut logging on the northern Alberta lands they claim.



Pizza Pizza is the target of the Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon because it buys paper products from the Japanese multinational giant Daishowa Paper Ltd.



Daishowa has been locked in a fierce battle with the Lubicon since 1988 over the company's clear-cuts under a forest management agreement the company signed with the Alberta government.



"We're asking people not to purchase Pizza Pizza products until Pizza Pizza stops using Daishowa paper products," said organizer Ed Bianchi.



The Lubicon blame the federal government for failing to settle their claim to roughly 4,050 hectares (10,000 acres).



The Friends of the Lubicon will picket a Pizza Pizza outlet at Yonge and Elm Sts. at noon tomorrow as the first strike in its demand for a national boycott of Daishowa products.



To end the boycott, the Lubicon want a written agreement from Daishowa stating it will not cut forests on Lubicon land until the and claim is settled. If the claim is won, as the Lubicon expect, such cutting would likely be prohibited.



Some companies contacted by Friends of the Lubicons have voluntarily dropped Daishowa products as requested, but Pizza Pizza is one of about 10 firms that have not yet responded.



Lorn Austin, executive director of Pizza Pizza Ltd., told the Star that he doesn't have an answer for the Lubicon because he doesn't have all the facts yet.



"My understanding is that Daishowa is applying pressure to both levels of government to resolve the situation (of the land claim)," Austin said. "But I also understand they (Daishowa) haven't violated any agreements."



He said Pizza Pizza only uses Daishowa products for the paper bags that cans of soft drinks and other products are delivered in. The company's pizza boxes are made of recycled paper supplied by Atlantic Packaging.



Earlier this week, Daishowa Canada President Tom Hamaoka told The Star's George Oake he was dismayed by the boycott plan.



Hamaoka added his company had agreed not to log on the disputed lands this winter, while urging provincial and federal governments to settle the 50-year old dispute.


Attachment #18: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Friday, November 29, 1991



LUBICON BACKERS TO BOYCOTT PIZZA CHAIN

ONLY DAISHOWA PAPER PRODUCTS USED ARE BEVERAGE BAGS, PIZZA PIZZA SAYS



Bob Cox

The Canadian Press

OTTAWA



Supporters of the Lubicon Indians say they'll press the Alberta band's bid for a land-claim settlement by boycotting a major pizza chain that uses Daishowa paper products.



"We're asking people not to purchase Pizza Pizza products until Pizza Pizza stops using Daishowa products," Ed Bianchi, of the Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon, said Thursday.



Daishowa owns an Alberta pulp mill and has logging rights in an area claimed by the Lubicon Cree. The company has promised not to take logs from there this winter.



Bianchi said demonstrators would picket a Toronto Pizza Pizza outlet Saturday. The group is awaiting responses from 10 other firms -- which Bianchi wouldn't name -- before deciding whether to boycott them.



Companies including Cultures Restaurants, Ho-Lee-Chow Restaurants and Knechtel Wholesale Grocers, have agreed not to use Daishowa products.



Lorn Austin, executive director of Pizza Pizza, said the company is being unfairly singled out because of its high profile.



The only Daishowa products used by Pizza Pizza are paper beverage bags and Pizza Pizza would stop using them if Daishowa began logging in the Lubicon area, said Austin.



The Lubicon want a written commitment from Daishowa to not cut trees or buy timber from the disputed territory until a settlement is negotiated with Ottawa. The area is 350 km north of Edmonton.



"What we need is a clear understanding, an understanding in writing, from Daishowa prior to any calling off of the boycott," said Lubicon chief Bernard Ominayak.



Tom Hamaoka, Daishowa Canada general manager, said the company would give a written commitment for this winter, but can't make a long-term promise because of agreements with smaller firms and the Alberta government.



"For me to unilaterally state that we will refrain from logging for an indefinite period would be in breach of my forest management agreement with the province of Alberta," said Hamaoka.



He said the boycott "is clearly a well-orchestra media campaign aimed at discrediting Daishowa" in the hopes the company will pressure governments to negotiate a settlement. But he said only the Lubicon and governments can reach a deal.



"They're unfairly implicating us in an issue which clearly we can't resolve."



Ottawa last offered the band $45 million and 246 square km of land in 1989. The band refused.



The Indian Affairs Department is reviewing a Lubicon proposal to re-open negotiations.


Attachment #19: TRANSCRIPT OF CBLT TV (CBC Local) News Broadcast (11:30 P.M.), Saturday, November 30, 1991



Noelle Richardson, CBLT



A Toronto-based group held a protest demonstration against a popular local fast food chain today, and it was all over a giant Japanese multinational company. It was the Pizza Pizza chain that was on the receiving end of today's demonstration. Protestors representing a group called the Friends of the Lubicon and the National Association of Japanese Canadians were handing out leaflets which advocated a boycott of Pizza Pizza. The group wants the chain to stop using products from the Daishowa pulp and paper mill. The boycott is aimed at preventing Daishowa from logging land which is claimed by the Lubicons as part of their historical nation. Pizza Pizza officials refused to go on camera to explain their side but spokesman Lorn Austen said by phone his company backs Daishowa in its negotiations with the Lubicon. Daishowa, for its part, has scheduled a news conference for Tuesday (December 3) to explain, what they say, is a misunderstanding.


Attachment #20: December 02, 1991, letter from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) to Pizza Pizza in Toronto



Dear Mr. Austin:



Chris Sonnen informed me on Saturday, November 30 that should we provide Pizza Pizza with proof that Daishowa had been clear-cutting on unceded Lubicon territories, Pizza Pizza would cancel their contract for paper products from Daishowa. Enclosed is a briefing on Daishowa activities in Lubicon territories.



I've included for your information newspaper articles detailing the granting of the original timber leases to Daishowa and subsequent developments, including the verbal agreement between the Lubicon Lake Nation and Daishowa that no cutting would be done on unceded Lubicon territories until after a land rights settlement was reached between the Lubicon Nation and both levels of government, and the breaking of that agreement in November 1990 when Daishowa subsidiary Brewster Construction began clearcutting in unceded Lubicon territories. Also enclosed are photographs of clear-cuts on Lubicon territories from Brewster and Buchanan Lumber's activities last winter from both the Japan Times Weekly and the Lubicon Nation. Since these are faxed copies, we can make available actual photographs within a fe days should you require them.



I should remind you that while Daishowa is currently playing the "innocent third party" they negotiated their Forest Management Agreement with the Alberta Government knowing full well that title to the area was disputed, having met with Lubicon chief Bernard Ominayak fully 17 months previous to signing the FMA. Daishowa has clearly broken the terms of their March 7, 1988, agreement with the Lubicon lake Nation and has been clear-cutting on unceded aboriginal territory. In fact, up until we began to mobilize a boycott of Daishowa products, the company was planning to continue clearcut operations this winter. Only when public pressure was applied did they change their plans for this winter. It is for this obvious reason that the cancellation of contracts with Daishowa is necessary: such a move may be the only way of halting further destruction before it's too late.



We will look forward to hearing from you as soon as possible.



Sincerely, Kevin Thomas, Friends of the Lubicon


Attachment #21: December 4, 1991, letter from Survival International to Marubeni Paper Sales, Europe



Dear Mr. Meares,



Survival International has noted with interest the establishment in the United Kingdom of a subsidiary of Marubeni Paper Sales Europe GmbH.



We are concerned that the close relationship between the Marubeni Corporation and the Daishowa Corporation may now lead to the importation into Britain of Daishowa pulp, paper or paper products. As you may be aware, the Daishowa Corporation's Canadian subsidiary, Daishowa Canada, is currently planning to engage in logging activities within the traditional territory of the Lubicon Lake Indian Nation.



The Lubicon people have never ceded their territory to Canada and have been attempting since 1939 to persuade the Canadian Federal Government to set aside part of their traditional territory as a reserve. The Federal Government has refused to negotiate in good faith with the Lubicon people. In the absence of a treaty between the Lubicon people and the Federal Government, the Government of Alberta has acted contrary to international law in granting to Daishowa Canada a Forestry Management Agreement covering unceded Lubicon lands.



We are also aware that Daishowa-Marubeni, a joint venture between Marubeni Corporation, your parent company, and Daishowa Paper, is currently considering the purchase of the bleached kraft pulp mill at Peace River, Alberta. It is to supply this pulp mill that Daishowa Canada, its current owner, has been planning to clear-cut forests in unceded Lubicon territory. Were Daishowa-Marubeni to proceed with this purchase, it would involve Marubeni subsidiaries even more closely in the injustice being perpetrated against the Lubicon people.



Given this regrettable state of affairs, we hope that you will be able to give us a categorical assurance that, until a just and final settlement has been reached between the Canadian Government and the Lubicon Lake Indian Nation, no Daishowa products will be imported into the United Kingdom by Marubeni or its subsidiaries; and that should Marubeni Corporation participate in the purchase of the Peace River pulp mill, it will refuse to engage in or promote any logging activities within traditional Lubicon territory.



Yours sincerely, Stephen Corry, Director General


Attachment #22: December 5, 1991, letter from THE BODY SHOP to Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)



Dear Mr. Bianchi:



I want to confirm that The Body Shop chose to remove Daishowa products from all of our Canadian stores in January of 1991 upon learning of the dispute between Daishowa Canada and the Lubicon Lake Cree Nation.



Since that time we have not purchased additional Daishowa products and will not do so until the current situation is satisfactorily resolved.



If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to contact me.



Sincerely, Ian Yolles


Attachment #23: WINDSPEAKER, December 6, 1991



BOYCOTT UNDERWAY AGAINST DAISHOWA PRODUCTS



By Cooper Langford

Windspeaker Staff Writer

OTTAWA



Three Ontario-based companies have joined a boycott of Daishowa paper products that organizers hope will become a national campaign against the pulp and paper giant.



"We are going to try to expand this," said Ed Bianchi, a spokesman for the Toronto-based groups Friends of the Lubicon, which is organizing the Ontario wing of the boycott.



Lubicon supporters in Edmonton say a similar boycott call for Alberta will be made in the first half of December.



"What you are going to see increasingly now is the public expression of what people have been working on for some time," Lubicon spokesman Fred Lennarson said.



Boycott organizers say they will keep up the campaign until the company makes a "firm, public commitment" not to log on disputed Lubicon land.



The Ontario boycott was announced at a recent press conference attended by Assembly of First Nations Grand Chief Ovide Mercredi and Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak at the assembly's Ottawa headquarters.



Native leaders called on the public to stop buying Pizza Pizza restaurant products because the company uses Daishowa paper for its soft drink bags.



Pizza Pizza was the only company out of the four targeted by the Friends of the Lubicon not to support the boycott call. Restaurant chains Culture Fresh Food and Ho-Lee Chow's said they will stop using Daishowa products as soon a current stocks run out. (Ho Lee Chow representatives said their decision came before they were contacted by Friends of the Lubicon.)



"I'm against clear cutting land," said Frank Rooke, a spokesman for Knetchel Grocery wholesalers, a company that serves 78 supermarkets in southern Ontario that will honor the boycott.



"It's strange we're criticizing Brazil when we're doing the same thing in Canada."



In Edmonton, Lubicon supporters are contacting Alberta companies identified as Daishowa customers and requesting they change their paper suppliers.



Lennarson said boycott plans have been in the works since this summer across Canada as well as in Europe and Japan.



So far, Daishowa appears to be avoiding direct reaction to the Ontario announcement. After speaking briefly with WINDSPEAKER, company officials faxed a news release reaffirming their position on the Lubicon.



"While Daishowa Canada deeply regrets this land claim dispute, we cannot resolve it. This matter must be resolved by both levels of government and the Lubicons," the statement read.



The company said it stands by its promise to stop buying wood harvested on land "of concern to the Lubicon." It also said it will not harvest timber in the disputed territory.



No one has put a dollar estimate on the potential value of the Daishowa boycott. Organizers say money is far less an important issue than bad publicity with the current slump in the pulp market and Daishowa's on-going effort to sell its operation near Peace River.



"I don't think the financial impact is the important thing. It's the publicity," said Lennarson.



In related news, Solicitor-General Dick Fowler recently heaped blame on Lubicon advisors and chief Bernard Ominayak for delays in settling the outstanding land claim.



In an interview with Standard Broadcast News, Fowler said Ominayak and his advisers have unfairly blocked a "very, very generous" settlement offer.



"If he (Ominayak) was getting good advise I think this thing would have been settled a long time ago," Fowler said.



"For whatever reason those people that are giving him advice continue to live in absolute and total comfort at what I presume to be very healthy incomes, while the Lubicon people that live in the area and are members of the band continue to suffer all the pains of poverty."


Attachment #24: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Friday, November 29, 1991,



EDITORIAL

ON WHOM THE BLAME FALLS



It is offensive to hear Native Affairs Minister Dick Fowler blaming the Lubicon Lake Cree for their own poverty.



Every man, woman and child in Little Buffalo would be wealthy today if the band had owned mineral rights in part of its traditional hunting and trapping area, and had collected the energy royalties that flowed continuously into the coffers of the province of Alberta through the 1970s and 1980s.



Even without mineral rights, the Lubicon people could have made a decent living through the same period if the Alberta government had moved forcefully to protect their trapping area from overzealous energy exploration crews.



This did not happen. Instead, the Alberta government extracted millions of dollars in royalties from the northern wilderness between the Peace and Athabasca rivers for two decades and returned almost none of the wealth to the original inhabitants of seven isolated communities. Until 1988, the province did everything it possibly could to undermine the legitimate Lubicon claim.



Fowler is free to blame Chief Bernard Ominayak for refusing Ottawa's "very, very generous" land claim settlement although the $45-million package is insufficient to build a self-supporting community from the ground up. But the minister can't deny one painful truth: The Lubicon Lake Cree are poor because the Alberta government made them poor.


Attachment #25: WINDSPEAKER, December 6, 1991



EDITORIAL

NATIVES SHOULD CONSIDER BOYCOTT



The fax machine at WINDSPEAKER was busy last week. Someone -- we're not absolutely sure who -- was sending us copies of letters from Ontario companies planning to join a boycott of Daishowa paper products.



Then came the Friends of the Lubicon boycott press conference announcement and a letter from Edmonton New Democrat MP Ross Harvey calling for a United Nations review of the Lubicon dispute. Both notices arrived within an hour of each other.



The people organizing the Daishowa boycott have their act together. This much preparation for news announcements usually generates some suspicions at newspapers. It's simply a gut reaction to people actively seeking publicity.



But the Daishowa boycott is an important story. Whether the boycott succeeds or fails, it will be strong measure of the depth of public support for the Lubicon.



Already three Ontario companies have joined forces to boycott Daishowa, and a fourth is considering it. Toronto's Pizza Pizza shop says if the Lubicons can prove Daishowa is cutting on the disputed land they will terminate their contract with Daishowa.



Some people might argue it is unfair to embroil third parties in a dispute between a Native community, the provincial government and to a greater or lesser extent, Daishowa.



But boycotts can work. And if the Native community's bottom line support rests with Lubicon, then the community should be prepared to back up that support. Even if that means dragging people not directly involved in land rights issues into the picture.



The Lubicon have shown that even a little guy can carry a big stick. That stick, however, is only as big as the public support it represents.



If you support the Lubicon land claim, honor the boycott. You'll be showing the community strength behind land rights issues across the country.



It's high time. The Lubicons have been ignored for far too long.


Attachment #26: PRESBYTERIAN RECORD, MISSION UPDATE, December 1991



EXCERPTS FROM AN OPEN LETTER TO PREMIER GETTY FROM THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN COUNCIL IN JAPAN



by Munetoshi Maejima, Gen. Sect'y



...As Japanese citizens, we realize the destruction our transnational corporations cause internationally. For short-term personal and national profits, they willingly sacrifice the futures of our and all people's children and grandchildren by irreparably destroying and polluting forests, seas and other areas which are necessary for a healthy world ecosystem. Daishowa utilizes obsolete harvesting and pulp processing technologies in its northern Alberta operations. Both the clearcutting of forests as well as the bleach kraft processing method are extremely hazardous to the environment. We find it offensive that Daishowa would use technology which is illegal in Japan in order to profit from polluting and destroying our neighbor's environment. We Japanese must take responsibility for reigning in such reckless and selfish behavior on the part of our corporations.



In addition, we want to emphasize that while Japanese people sincerely wish to develop mutually beneficial economic relations with the Albertan people, we cannot build an economy based upon the oppression of minorities such as the Lubicon. To do so would be contrary to all principles of economic justice and can only lead to further problems in the future. We believe that sustainable, just and participatory development of our resources is not only possible but necessary in a world increasingly threatened by rampant overconsumption and willful pollution of our environment. In addition, we believe that in the case of Alberta, positive Canadian-Japanese economic development cannot proceed without first the Lubicon land rights issue being resolved in a just and fair manner.



Therefore, we Japanese citizens in solidarity with the Lubicon people and Alberta citizens, urge you to use all means available to:



(1) Stop Daishowa Canada and any of its subsidiaries from logging within the disputed territory until the Lubicon land rights issue has been justly resolved;



(2) Negotiate a land rights settlement between the Lubicon and both levels of government which is fair and just for all parties;



(3) Require that Daishowa Canada and its subsidiaries utilize timber harvesting, reforestation, and pulp processing technologies at least comparable to those required by environmental protection laws in Japan.



We believe that these measures are in the best interests of the Albertan and Japanese people for building a just and mutually beneficial relationship of economic cooperation and development.


Attachment #27: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Saturday, December 7, 1991



BOYCOTT HURTING DAISHOWA

LUBICON TALKS MAY RESUME



Paul Marck

Journal Staff Writer

EDMONTON



A countrywide boycott of Daishowa forestry products appears to be playing a role in the reopening of negotiations for a Lubicon Indian land claim.



Tom Hamaoka, Daishowa Canada vice-president, said from Vancouver Friday the week-old boycott of his company's paper products is hurting.



"It's gotten to a stage now where, yes, we are felling the economics...at least our eastern operations are."



Daishowa, with a pulp mill in Peace River, has a forestry management agreement with the provincial government to log lands that include territory claimed by the Lubicon. The company has agreed to keep off disputed lands this winter.



Hamaoka met Indian Affairs officials in Ottawa last week, urging them to settle with the Lubicon. Federal Indian Affairs Minister Tom Siddon then sent a letter to Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak, inviting him and Alberta Solicitor General Dick Fowler, minister responsible for native affairs, to meet in early February.



Siddon's letter of Nov. 29 said there is "sufficient common ground for renewed substantive discussions" over the land claim.



Negotiations have stalled for three years with the federal government's "final offer" of $45 million in cash in response to the band's request for $170 million. All parties agree on a proposed 246-square-km reserve between Lubicon Lake and Buffalo Lake, east of Peace River.



Thursday, Premier Don Getty met Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and discussed various issues, including the Lubicon problem.



At a joint news conference afterwards, Getty said he offered Mulroney insights and suggestions to "close the gap" for a Lubicon settlement. Neither leader would elaborate.



Ominayak welcomes Getty's help but doesn't know what it's about.



"No, I haven't heard what was said, I haven't heard at all," Ominayak said in Edmonton Friday.



"If Mr. Getty is encouraging the prime minister to get the matter dealt with, we certainly appreciate that," Ominayak said.



Meanwhile, Daishowa's Hamaoka couldn't estimate how much the boycott is hurting the Japanese multinational company, but a couple of restaurant and grocery chains are known to have cancelled or let lapse contracts for paper products like bags and napkins.



"With the boycott I thought I'd seize the opportunity to see the Indian Affairs Department and I reiterated our position again that we would like the government to get involved more directly in trying to resolve this matter," Hamaoka said. "The opportunity presented itself for the minister to move...I'm encouraged that both levels of government and the Lubicons are planning to meet...Daishowa can't resolve it."



Ominayak deserves credit for his persistence in seeking a settlement when government has been unwilling to move, Hamaoka added.



Band advisor Fred Lennarson said Getty could be pushing Mulroney for a settlement due to land-claim pressures on business, such as the Daishowa boycott and the Quebec Crees' bid to block hydro development in that province.



It's hard to show that Canada is open for business with outstanding native issues blocking development and throwing a scare into industry, Lennarson said.



The Daishowa boycott, kicked off by Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon at a First Nations conference Nov. 28, has spread internationally, Lennarson said. There are lobby efforts against Daishowa going on in Japan, Switzerland, Germany, France and Australia.



"I really don't think the amount of money they're losing is a big problem," Lennarson said. But Daishowa is having financial problems due to poor market conditions worldwide. "I think adverse publicity is creating major problems for them."



Ominayak sent a response to Siddon Friday, cautiously accepting his invitation to reopen negotiations.



No direct negotiations between the 500-member band, at Little Buffalo Lake, 350-km northwest of Edmonton, and the federal government have taken place since 1988. The Lubicon and the province haven't had formal negotiations over land or resources since then, either.


Attachment #28: ALBERTA NATIVE NEWS, December, 1991



LUBICON CHIEF TO MEET WITH SIDDON AND FOWLER

OMINAYAK AND BAND ADVISER REACT TO FOWLER'S MEDIA ATTACK



By Dale Stelter



An early February meeting has been set up between Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak, federal Indian Affairs Minister Tom Siddon, and Alberta Native Affairs Minister Dick Fowler, to seek a settlement of the Lubicon's decades-long land rights dispute.



On December 2nd, Ominayak received an invitation to the meeting in a faxed letter from Siddon -- shortly before he began receiving calls from reporters about the letter.



Ominayak confirmed his attendance at the meeting in a December 4th letter to Siddon, in which he also responded to inaccuracies in Siddon's letter regarding the Lubicon's counter-proposal to the take-it-or-leave-it settlement which the federal government put forth in early 1989.



The federal offer would provide the Lubicon with up to $45 million, and 246 square kilometres of land. The Lubicon have not accepted that offer, and are asking for approximately $170 million to go with the land. The Lubicon maintain that this amount is essential if they are to build a self-sufficient community and ensure control over their own lives, after destruction of their traditional economy and way of life by oil and gas development.



There is speculation that in calling for the meeting, the federal government is reacting to the effectiveness of the Lubicon's efforts to stop Daishowa Canada from logging on their traditional lands until their land rights dispute is settled. Those efforts include the national boycott of Daishowa products.



On December 5th, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and Premier Don Getty met in private in Edmonton. In a news conference after their meeting, Getty said that he offered advice to Mulroney on achieving a settlement with the Lubicon. No other details were given.



The Lubicon are approaching the meeting with Siddon and Fowler with caution. In his letter to Siddon, Ominayak wrote that "In the hope that you and your Provincial counterpart are finally serious about achieving a settlement of Lubicon land rights -- in spite of all that you've both been doing lately to suggest otherwise -- I look forward to a meeting with you and Mr. Fowler in early February."



Ominayak was referring to, for example, the broadside delivered at him and Lubicon advisors by Fowler.



The EDMONTON JOURNAL reported that in an interview with Standard Broadcast News, Fowler said that Ominayak and his advisers are to blame for blocking settlement of the Lubicon's long-standing land rights dispute, and that the Lubicon have been offered a better settlement than any other band in Alberta.



Ominayak responded to Fowler's remarks by saying that "The Alberta and federal governments have made great efforts to undermine the leadership of the Lubicon people. They're the ones who have forced our people into the situation we're in today."



Band adviser Fred Lennarson said that aiming personal attacks at him and at Ominayak are an attempt to draw attention away from the main issue of settling the Lubicon's land rights dispute. He outright rejected Fowler's suggestion that the federal government's settlement offer to the Lubicon is better than all others in Alberta, pointing out that even Premier Getty had some time ago labelled the federal government's offer as deficient.


Attachment #29: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Tuesday, December 10, 1991



PEOPLE, NOT PROFITS, DRIVE DESIRE FOR LUBICON SETTLEMENT, GETTY SAYS



Marilyn Moysa

Journal Staff Writer

Edmonton



Premier Don Getty says it's the welfare of the Lubicon Lake Indians -- not Daishowa -- that's fuelling his drive for the northwest Alberta band.



"I haven't looked at this issue at all from the corporate point of view," Getty said Monday, contradicting statements made last Friday by band adviser Fred Lennarson.



Lennarson said Getty may have been moved to raise the land claim issue with Prime Minister Brian Mulroney when the two met in Edmonton last Thursday because of boycott pressures on Daishowa.



But Getty said Monday that Daishowa officials didn't pressure him prior to the meeting and that Lennarson was "incorrect".



"I've looked at it only fro the people point of view, which is the band, and that's what drives me," he said. "It was my own initiative because I care about the band."



Daishowa's $550-million bleached kraft mill in Peace River was the first major forestry project announced in Getty's economic diversification strategy.



Before the mill was given a speedy environmental review, Getty called the project an important cornerstone in helping to expand the province's economy.



Friday, Daishowa Canada vice-president Tom Hamaoka admitted a week-long countrywide boycott of Daishowa's products was hurting the Japanese multi-national company enough that it had urged Ottawa to settle with the band.



The boycott was launched despite the fact that Daishowa -- which has a forestry management agreement with the provincial government to log lands that include territory claimed by the Lubicons -- has agreed to stay off the disputed lands this winter.



Negotiations between the federal government and the 500-member band stalled three years ago after Ottawa tabled a "final offer" of $45 million in cash. The band is seeking more than $170 million.



During his Thursday meeting with Mulroney, Getty said he'd offered suggestions that would "close the gap" on a settlement. However, neither leader would elaborate further.



The fact his proposal to Mulroney came a day before Daishowa admitted it had urged Ottawa to settle the land claim is "not related," Getty said.



"Daishowa never talked to me -- nor did anyone -- about it," he said.



The premier refused to disclose further details of his proposal to the prime minister. Nor has he been able to fill Lubicon band chief Bernard Ominayak in on it.



"Out of necessity, it was confidential," he said. "But it was an attempt to solve it."



Getty said he has no current plans to meet with Ominayak. "But if the chief in any way felt it would be helpful for me to meet with him, I'd enjoy meeting with him.



"He's a friend," he said.


Attachment #30: December 11, 1991, letter from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) to Pizza Pizza



Dear Mr. Austin:



We are disappointed that you have refused to meet with us concerning the ongoing boycott of Daishowa Canada Ltd. paper products and your company's inclusion in that boycott. It was our belief that face-to-face discussion of the issues might give us the opportunity to resolve our dispute with Pizza Pizza.



Even more distressing to us is your insistence over the phone that the issue is pretty much resolved and that as a result Pizza Pizza no longer has an obligation to take any ethical position on this matter. It is distressing because it's simply not true.



The federal government has made some overtures to the Lubicon Lake Nation over the past week and meetings have been agreed to for early February. However much we would like to, though, we find it difficult to put much faith in these meetings as some kind of salvation for the Lubicon people. Need we remind you that countless meetings have been held between all parties over a span of fifty years and to this date there is still no resolution of the Lubicon people's land rights.



Regardless, we are baffled by your insistence that the announcement of these meetings absolves Daishowa of any responsibility for making a clear, public and unequivocal commitment not to cut or to buy wood cut on unceded Lubicon territories until a land rights settlement is reached with both levels of government and a harvesting agreement negotiated with the Lubicon Lake Nation. If Daishowa is truly acting ethically and responsibly, what prevents them from making such a commitment? If, for the sake of argument, the meetings in February by some miracle resulted in a land rights agreement that was satisfactory to the Lubicon people, then Daishowa, even on the terms of such a commitment, would be free to negotiate a harvesting agreement with the Lubicon people and the matter would be resolved. However, without such a commitment, the threat of vast clearcutting on their unceded traditional territory will still hang over the heads of the Lubicon people should their land rights remain unresolved after February's meetings, and that is and always will be unacceptable.



We remain bewildered as to why Pizza Pizza would want to keep company with a conglomerate that is unwilling to make such a commitment. It seems to us that if Daishowa truly had faith in the upcoming meetings, they would make the kind of clear, public and unequivocal commitment we are asking, and in doing so end the boycott action against them and you.



We are also concerned that you have consistently misrepresented the issue as one of a 'breach of agreement' between Daishowa and the Lubicons, saying that you would cancel your contracts if that breach was proven. It is our position that regardless of what has happened in the past, Daishowa has the ethical obligation of making a commitment now. We are not concerned with dry legalistic matters of 'breach of agreement' or the legalities of leases. The planned clearcutting of unceded Aboriginal land and the subsequent genocide of an entire Aboriginal culture is a crime against humanity and the environment we live in. It is completely beyond me why Pizza Pizza would want to associate itself with such a crime. You have claimed that Daishowa has the right to due process, and that we must prove that they've done wrong. On December 2 we submitted to you documented proof that Daishowa had clearcut last year on unceded Lubicon territories. You responded by saying we still hadn't proven the 'breach of agreement' and that the Province of Alberta had given them permission to cut on Lubicon territories. It may be the case that the law and the Province would choose to allow such a crime to be committed, but there is no reason why the people of Canada should allow it to be done. It is a matter of public record that Daishowa plans to commit this crime again. Pizza Pizza is amongst those companies that, as Daishowa clients, are in a position to force Daishowa to cancel these plans by cancelling paper contracts with them. The issue requires that you make an ethical decision on the issue of clearcutting unceded Aboriginal lands, and in the end we believe it requires that Pizza Pizza break ties with the kind of company that carries out such crimes.



In the absence of any decision on your part we will be continuing the boycott of Pizza Pizza stores.



Sincerely, Ed Bianchi, Friends of the Lubicon


Attachment #31: EDMONTON EXAMINER, December 14-15, 1991



WORLDWIDE PRESSURE BUILDS ON DAISHOWA



by Dale Stelter



Daishowa Canada, one of the major companies in Alberta's drive for forestry development, is in the public spotlight again. The Lubicon Lake Indian Nation of northern Alberta has launched a boycott of Daishowa products, and the company has admitted that it is feeling the financial effects of the boycott.



The Lubicon launched the boycott because Daishowa Canada is not adhering to a March, 1988, agreement between the company and the Lubicon. Under that agreement, Daishowa is not to log on land claimed by the Lubicon until a settlement of the band's decades-long land rights dispute is obtained, and an agreement is reached concerning Lubicon environmental and wildlife concerns.



The boycott is a clear demonstration of what can happen when government and industry persist in following misguided and destructive policies toward the environment, and in blatantly disregarding the concerns of Aboriginal people.



By way of background, the Lubicon maintain that since they have never signed a treaty with the federal government, they have never ceded Aboriginal title to their traditional lands. After their traditional way of life was shattered by rampant oil and gas exploitation, the Lubicon were never consulted when the Alberta government allocated their entire traditional territory to Daishowa, excepting a proposed reserve. That reserve is completely surrounded by Daishowa's Forest Management Agreement.



So far, Daishowa Canada has stated that neither it, nor its contractors, nor Brewster Construction Ltd. - a wholly-owned subsidiary of Daishowa Canada - will log on disputed land this winter. Last winter, Brewster Construction and a contractor with Daishowa undertook clearcutting operations on land claimed by the Lubicon.



Tom Hamaoka, vice-president of Daishowa Canada, a subsidiary of the Japanese multinational Daishowa Paper Manufacturing Company, has stated that he feels the boycott is "totally unwarranted." He also feels the boycott is based on inaccurate information, and on incorrect accusations by Friends of the Lubicon, the Toronto-based group involved in many of the boycott activities.



Companies participating in the boycott obviously feel otherwise. For example, a representative of Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants wrote to Friends of the Lubicon that "after careful research into the current situation in Alberta, Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants has decided to stop using Daishowa products." A buyer/merchandiser with Knechtel Wholesale Grocers wrote that "I have had time to read both sides of the problem and I have to side with The Friends of the Lubicon".



Meanwhile, the Lubicon continue to receive international support in their land rights dispute. A Germany-based group called Big Mountain Aktionsgruppe e.V. is coordinating Lubicon support in Europe, involving organizations and individuals in countries such as France, England, Luxembourg, Austria, Sweden, Norway, Italy, Poland and Czechoslovakia. Part of the European support effort involves a Stop Daishowa Campaign. Work on behalf of the Lubicon is also going on in Japan -- the home of Daishowa Canada's parent company -- and the United States and Australia.



For example, in October, an Australian organization named The Wilderness Society called upon the Australian government "to exert international pressure on the environmental and social policies of Daishowa Seishi, whose forestry operations have prompted a worldwide plea for help from the Lubicon Indian Nation of Canada."


Attachment #32: December 12, 1991, News Release by Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)



THE ISSUE IS CLEAR CUT

BOYCOTT DAISHOWA

BOYCOTT PIZZA PIZZA



The national boycott of Daishowa paper products announced on November 28 will continue on Saturday, December 14 with simultaneous leafleting demonstrations at nine Pizza Pizza locations in Toronto, as well as Pizza Pizza outlets in Hamilton, London, Guelph, Kingston, and Kitchener, from 12 noon to 3 p.m.



Although Daishowa has admitted to being hurt by the boycott, they are still refusing to make a clear, public and unequivocal commitment not to cut or to buy wood cut on unceded Lubicon territories until a land rights settlement is reached with both levels of government. They say that meetings between the Lubicon people, the Federal government and the Provincial government scheduled for early February make the whole issue a moot point. We say the issue is clear cut. Daishowa has to make the ethical decision not to cut on unceded aboriginal territory, period. Why are they afraid to put that on paper?



IF THE SHOE FITS



Daishowa Vice President Tom Hamaoka has been inferring that the Friends of the Lubicon have been making incorrect accusations and unfairly 'portraying Daishowa as villains in a situation which they are powerless to resolve'. Unfortunately for Hamaoka, the facts speak for themselves. The problem isn't that Daishowa isn't capable of making the kind of commitment we are asking for: it's that they are unwilling to.



PUT IT ON PAPER, PLEASE



Last year, Daishowa broke a 1988 agreement between the Lubicon and Daishowa that there would be no cutting on unceded Lubicon territory until there was a settlement of Lubicon land rights. Daishowa sub-contractor Buchanan Lumber Ltd. began clear-cutting on Lubicon land last November. Since the agreement was a verbal one, Daishowa has tried to fool people into believing there was no agreement.



The March 7, 1988, agreement between the Lubicons and Daishowa provided that Daishowa would stay out of the unceded Lubicon territory until there was a settlement of Lubicon land rights. Since then Daishowa officials, including Canadian Vice President Mr. Tom Hamaoka, have claimed that:



*their subsidiary and subcontractors weren't covered by the agreement

*that terms of the agreement were satisfied by the totally unrelated Grimshaw Agreement

*that the agreement only provided there'd be no logging in "new areas"

*that the agreement only covered the proposed reserve area

*that there wasn't and never had been any agreement.



PIZZA PIZZA POSITION CLEAR CUT



Pizza Pizza has said that it backs Daishowa in its negotiations with the Lubicon.



The Friends of the Lubicon yesterday released an open letter to Pizza Pizza outlining our position (copies are available from us). We have yet to receive any response.



Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) in conjunction with other Lubicon supporters will continue the boycott campaign against Daishowa, and users of Daishowa products, until there is a clear, public and unequivocal commitment from Daishowa, in writing, that says they will respect Lubicon land rights by not harvesting trees and not buying trees cut on Lubicon land until Lubicon land rights have been negotiated.



For more information call the Friends of the Lubicon at 416-783-4694. Numbers for spokespeople in each of the participating cities are available from us.


Attachment #33: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Monday, December 16, 1991



REVIVAL OF LUBICON TALKS RAISES A GLIMMER OF HOPE FOR DEAL



Paul Marck

Journal Staff Writer

Edmonton



The resumption of land-claim talks between government and the Lubicon Lake Indian band casts a ray of light over a dark past.



Indian and Northern Affairs Minister Tom Siddon announced late last month that there is "sufficient common ground for renewed substantive discussions between Canada, Alberta" and the Lubicons, after his first face-to-face meeting with Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak.



Ominayak says it's not impossible for the three parties to talk.



"There's certainly going to have to be the wills on the part of the government to facilitate an agreement. If it takes three, we'd certainly look at such a meeting."



The negotiations are scheduled to reopen in February.



Money has been the major sticking point in the dispute.



The band has accepted an offer of 246 square km for a reserve at Lubicon Lake, 350 km northwest of Edmonton.



But talks broke off in January, 1989, when Ominayak rejected the federal government's "take-it-or-leave-it" proposal of $45 million in compensation.



The band wants $170 million from Ottawa.



The federal government now says all of the band's concerns are on the table.



Bob Coulter, a special-projects executive with Indian and Northern Affairs in Ottawa, said the February meeting means more than rehashing the government's three-year-old offer as it stands.



"We're prepared to discuss all of the band's demands. I don't know whether you want to characterize this as something new."



The 500-member Lubicon Lake band has tried settling a land claim with the federal government for more than 50 years. The Lubicons maintain -- and the government acknowledges -- the band was left out of turn-of-the-century negotiations that extinguished native land claims in northern Alberta, and therefore no settlement was ever achieved.



Since Siddon's invitation to reopen talks, three major developments have occurred:



*Premier Don Getty made a vague pronouncement at a joint news conference with Prime Minister Brian Mulroney that he had insights and suggestions to "close the gap" for a Lubicon settlement. Neither leader would elaborate.



*Daishowa Canada, with a $550-million logging and pulp mill operation at Peace River admitted it talked to Indian Affairs late last month about jump-starting negotiations. Daishowa has an agreement with the provincial government to log in the area, including disputed lands claimed by the Lubicon.



*The nearby community of Loon Lake, just east of the disputed Lubicon lands, announced it has successfully petitioned Ottawa for band status with up to 350 people. As many as 80 had been counted as Lubicon members.



Ominayak says if there's nothing new on the table, there's nothing to discuss with Siddon.



"From our side of the table what we'd like to have is something that would enable our people to start building for a half-decent future," Ominayak says.



"From his side of the table it seems to be a take-it-or-leave it proposal that's going to leave our people on welfare for the rest of our lives. I think those are the major differences."



Lubicon adviser Fred Lennarson is wary of the government's motives. He suspects Indian Affairs is conducting a propaganda campaign, trying to show sincerity while "hammering the Lubicons" into accepting its previous offer.



As evidence he suggests the creation of two neighboring bands is serving to disillusion the Lubicons.



To the west, the Woodland Cree was created last year with about 650 members, and a $58-million cash and 367-square-km land settlement. To the east, the Loon Lake band will be created early in the new year.



Between them it dilutes the Lubicon membership of 500. From as few as a handful to as many as 80 on Lubicon rolls are expected to join Loon Lake, and Woodland takes in up to about 80 former band members.



Coulter of Indian Affairs says the Lubicon claim is a valid one, but so are the others.



Historic ties to individual communities -- Cadotte Lake for the Woodland Cree, Little Buffalo for the Lubicon and Loon Lake for the proposed Loon Lake band -- will determine what band people will associate with, Coulter says.



Meanwhile, Daishowa has a major stake in negotiations. Its Peace River pulp mill, two sawmills and forestry-management agreement with the province is a major investment that can't be fully utilized without a settlement, because part of its agreement takes in disputed Lubicon lands.


Attachment #34: December 17, 1991, letter from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto) to The Hon. Marilyn Churley, Minister responsible for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario



Dear Ms. Churley:



Please examine the enclosures in your consideration to stop using Daishowa paper products at the LCBO.



Friends of the Lubicon announced a nationwide Daishowa boycott in Ottawa at the Assembly of First Nations press conference on November 28th. 4 out of the 5 businesses approached thus far have terminated Daishowa as their paper supplier.



In addition to the Assembly of First Nations, this boycott already has the backing of the 50,000 strong National Association of Japanese canadians (NAJC), the Action Canada Network, the Native Women's Association of Canada and Environment Probe. Responses from numerous organizations are pending.



We request a meeting before your decision and hope to hear from you soon.



Thank you for your time.



Sincerely, Stephen Kenda, Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)


Attachment #35: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Tuesday, December 17, 1991



BOYCOTT AGAINST DAISHOWA SHIFTS TO ALBERTA TODAY

LUBICON BACKERS HAPPY WITH RESULTS IN ONTARIO



Paul Marck

Journal Staff Writer

Edmonton



The national boycott of Daishowa paper products -- in support of the Lubicon Indian Band's land settlement claim -- kicks off in Alberta today.



A nationwide boycott of the Japanese multinational's forestry products was announced by the support group Friends of the Lubicon late last month in Toronto.



Lubicon supporters hope a news conference today in Edmonton outside the Daishowa offices will achieve the same results at those seen in Ontario, Barry Johnstone, chairman of the Alberta Environmental Alliance, said Monday.



"This provides an opportunity for ordinary people who might be concerned about some of the issues concerning forestry or concerning native rights to voice their concerns through the market," he said.



An Ontario restaurant chain and a string of grocery markets have agreed to stop using Daishowa paper products. The company has admitted the boycott is hurting its eastern market.



The Alberta Environmental Alliance, part of a coalition of Lubicon supporters, hopes to achieve similar results here, Johnstone said.



Daishowa, with a pulp mill and two saw mills at Peace River, has disputed Lubicon lands in logging territory awarded the company in its forestry management agreement with the province.



Daishowa has agreed to stay out of the disputed area this winter.



Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak will attend the news conference along with supporters at 10 a.m. today outside the Daishowa offices at the Royal Trust Tower, on 101st Street between Jasper Avenue and 102nd Avenue.



The 500-member Lubicon band and the federal government have fought over a land settlement for 50 years. Negotiations are set to reopen in February.


Attachment #36: December 17, 1991, Media Release by coalition group in Calgary, Alberta, organizing boycott Daishowa efforts in that area



BOYCOTT OF DAISHOWA!!!!





Recognizing the impending threat to the very existence of the Lubicon society and the fragile northern eco-system, a coalition of Calgary groups, consisting of the Calgary Labour Council, the Calgary Rainforest Action Group, the Committee Against Racism, Northern Light and the Plains Indian Cultural Survival School are today joining other groups from across Canada in their call for a boycott of Daishowa and their products. This boycott will be effective until Daishowa makes a clear, firm and public commitment to not cut and not to purchase any wood cut on unceded Lubicon territory until AFTER A SETTLEMENT of Lubicon land rights and negotiation of a harvesting agreement with the Lubicon people that takes into account Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. The coalition is also calling on Daishowa to immediately cease all of its clearcutting and purchasing of trees from the Wood Buffalo National Park, a World Heritage Site of the stature of the Pyramids of Gizeh and the Grand Canyon, and to implement sustainable forestry practices in all of its FMA areas.



This call for a boycott of Daishowa is also being made today in Edmonton, where a coalition of groups, including the Action Canada Network and the Missionary Oblates, is joining in to stop the genocide of the Lubicon society.



A call for a boycott of Daishowa and its products by the Friends of the Lubicon in Toronto has so far resulted in several companies agreeing to stop using Daishowa products, e.g. Cultures Fresh Food restaurants, Knechtels Wholesale Grocers, Ho-Lee-Chow restaurants and The Body Shop. Additionally the YWCA in Toronto, which is currently asking for tenders for their paper products, has stated that it will not accept any bids from suppliers using Daishowa products.



Background: Daishowa and its Threat to the Survival of the Lubicon Cree Nation



In a meeting between Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak and Daishowa Senior Vice President and General Manager Koichi Kitigawa on March 8, 1988, an agreement was reached that Daishowa would stay out of unceded Lubicon territory until a settlement of Lubicon land rights had been achieved and a logging agreement regarding Lubicon wildlife management and environmental concerns worked out with the Lubicon people.



The March 7, 1988, agreement between Daishowa and the Lubicon people was negotiated in the context of nation-wide protests over a February 8, 1988, announcement that the Alberta Provincial Government had sold Daishowa the trees from an immense, 29,000 sq. mile area which completely blankets the unceded Lubicon territory. The trees from this huge area are intended to feed a massive, environmentally questionable bleached kraft pulp mill which Daishowa was proposing to build just outside of the traditional Lubicon territory with millions of dollars in Federal and Provincial Government subsidy money.



In retrospect it is likely that officials of Daishowa really believed at this point that Lubicon land rights would be settled before they planned to log unceded Lubicon territory starting in 1990, and that therefore all they had to do was quiet the raging storm by basically making whatever kind of agreement they had to with the Lubicons -- like in the old treaty-making days when treaty commissioners admitted that they were prepared to promise the Indians almost anything in order to avoid a confrontation before Canadian Government military forces were sufficiently strong to suppress any possible resistance.



On September 14, 1989 -- some 18 months after negotiation of the March 7th agreement and without benefit of any further discussions between Daishowa and the Lubicon people -- a 20 year Forest Management Agreement was signed between Daishowa and the Alberta Provincial Government. The Peace River pulp mill was opened in September of 1990.



Lubicon land rights of course were not settled by the fall of 1989 and by then didn't seem likely to be settled in the foreseeable future. Officials of Daishowa consequently grew increasingly restive and started making a number of moves clearly intended to circumvent the March 7, 1988, Lubicon agreement.



Attempts by Daishowa to circumvent the March 7, 1988, agreement included





After over a decade of government-sponsored and encouraged massive oil & gas exploration, and without the benefit of a settlement of their aboriginal land rights, the Lubicon society now faces the threat of large-scale clearcutting of its traditional hunting and trapping area.



The damage done to the fragile ecology of Alberta's north by the effects of clearcutting and the pollution caused by the outdated and irresponsible kraft process of producing wood pulp is matched by the devastating effects this large-scale intrusion will have on the already battered Lubicon society. Should this new phase of un-checked 'development' go ahead, the destruction and extinction of the traditional Lubicon society is certain.



For further information contact:



Committee Against Racism (403) 282-6845

Northern Light (403) 244-1975

Calgary Labour Council (403) 262-2390

Calgary Rainforest Action Group (403) 244-5083

Friends of the Lubicon, Toronto (416) 972-6293, 947-0808, 783-4694

Action Canada Network (403) 483-3021

Missionary Oblates (403) 488-4767


Attachment #37: Transcript of CKUA Radio News Broadcast (12:00 Noon) Tuesday, December 17, 1991



Don Bell, CKUA



...to make the announcement of their plans at the Edmonton office of the Japanese paper company. But security guards and police prevented them from entering the office tower where it's located. They also prevented non-boycotters from entering the tower which caused some annoyance. Leaders of the boycott are trying to cause more than just annoyance for Daishowa however. Lucien Royer of the Action Canada Network says over 800 organizations will be asked to take part...Royer says the idea is to apply enough pressure on Daishowa so that it will in turn apply pressure on Ottawa to agree to a land claim settlement the Lubicons can live with.





Lucien Royer, Action Canada Network



The federal government is responsible to negotiate, but the federal government doesn't listen to Indians. The federal government doesn't listen to Albertans. The federal government doesn't listen to Canadians. And our intent is to put pressure on Daishowa because the federal government will listen to Daishowa.



Bell



But Lubicon advisor Fred Lennarson says the Daishowa boycott is not designed to just be a political lever. He says it's being done because Daishowa is threatening to clear-cut trees on land in northern Alberta being claimed by the Lubicons.



Fred Lennarson, Lubicon Advisor



Daishowa has not just been singled out as some kind of political lever. Daishowa is being stopped because Daishowa is proposing to go in and clear-cut Lubicon trees.



Bell



A meeting between Ottawa, Alberta and the Lubicons has been proposed for February, about the time the boycott is designed to be in full gear. Lennarson says he's hopeful something will encourage the Mulroney Government to do the right thing. He says it won't if it has any alternatives. Don Bell, CKUA News, Edmonton.


Attachment #38: Transcript of CKUA Radio News Broadcast (5:15 P.M.) Tuesday, December 17, 1991



Don Bell, CKUA News



In the headlines: Lubicon supporters are expanding their boycott of Daishowa.



Supporters of the Lubicon Indian Band are expanding their boycott of Daishowa paper products. The boycott, which started in Ontario, is now being called a national effort. Lucien Royer of the Action Canada Network says over 800 organizations will be asked to take part...Lubicon advisor Fred Lennarson says the boycott is not simply for political reasons. He says Daishowa is being targeted because the company wants to cut down trees on land claimed by the Lubicons.



Fred Lennarson, Lubicon Advisor



Daishowa has not just been singled out as some kind of political lever. Daishowa is being stopped because Daishowa is proposing to go in and clear-cut Lubicon trees.



Bell



The Vice-President of Daishowa Canada says the boycott against his company could hurt the Province. Tom Hamaoka says the boycott isn't having much impact on Daishowa's operation at Peace River right now, but he says if the land claim dispute is not settled soon and the boycott drags on, Alberta's economy will suffer.



Tom Hamaoka, Vice-President, Daishowa Canada



This boycott could have long-term negative impacts from the perspective of trying to seek future investors in northern Alberta and in this respect the boycott will be counter-productive to us all -- the Lubicons, Daishowa, the community and the Province.


Attachment #39: Transcript of CBC Radio News Broadcast (4:30 P.M.) Tuesday, December 17, 1991



Neil Smith, CBC



A national lobby group is calling on Albertans to boycott Daishowa paper products. The Action Canada Network in Edmonton says that's the only way to get Ottawa to resume serious land claim talks with the Lubicon Indians. Lydia Newfeld reports.



Lydia Newfeld, CBC



Daishowa operates a pulp mill near Peace River. Some of the trees that find their way to that mill come from land the Lubicon Indians claim belongs to them. That's the point of this boycott. Lucien Royer with Action Canada Network in Edmonton is calling on people in Alberta to look for the Daishowa symbol and not support the businesses that use Daishowa paper products. Their products might be paper bags or boxes. Royer says the boycott will hit Daishowa where it counts -- in the pocket book -- which in turn may finally get Ottawa to resume serious land claim talks with the Lubicon Indian Band.



Lucien Royer, Action Canada Network



The Federal Government is responsible to negotiate, but the Federal Government doesn't listen to Indians. The Federal Government doesn't listen to Albertans. The Federal Government doesn't listen to Canadians. Our intent is to put pressure on Daishowa because the Federal Government will listen to Daishowa.



Reporter



Because money talks?



Royer



Money talks.



Newfeld



Royer says over the next few weeks his group will identify businesses in Alberta which use Daishowa products. They'll be asked to boycott the pulp and paper company. If they don't, Royer is threatening to picket these businesses. Officials with Daishowa in Edmonton couldn't be reached for comment. The doors to the company's office were locked to keep out Royer and his supporters.


Attachment #40: Transcript of CBC Radio News Broadcast (5:30 P.M.) Tuesday, December 17, 1991



Neil Smith, CBC



A group of demonstrators was locked out of the Edmonton building today that contains the offices of Daishowa Pulp and Paper Company. The demonstration was called by the Action Canada Network. It wants to put pressure on the federal government to resolve the Lubicon land claim. Lydia Newfeld has the story.



Lydia Newfeld, CBC



Members of Action Canada Network and other supporters of the Lubicon Lake Indian Band gathered in a downtown mall outside the office tower which houses Daishowa's offices in Edmonton. Security guards locked the office doors, leaving Lucien Royer of Action Canada Network and his supporters standing in the middle of the shopping mall. Royer called for a boycott of Daishowa paper products.



Lucien Royer, Action Canada Network



We will ask Canadians to look at the bottom of paper bags and find the Daishowa logo and to approach merchants across the country to encourage them to join the boycott. If we find that merchants refuse to join the boycott, we will be organizing rotating pickets to inform Canadians that the merchants are not joining the boycott.


Attachment #41: Transcript of CBC TV News Broadcast (6:00 P.M.) Tuesday, December 17, 1991



Bob Chelmick, CBC News



A giant pulp and paper company in northern Alberta has become the focus of a national boycott. Today in Calgary and Edmonton, supporters of the Lubicon Indian Band announced plans to target businesses which use paper products produced by Daishowa. Daishowa is the Japanese company which operates the new pulp mill near Peace River, a company that has timber rights to thousands of square kilometres of Alberta forest land, land the Lubicon claim is theirs. Rick Boguski has our story.



Rick Boguski, CBC News



Lubicon supporters gathered outside Daishowa's Edmonton office urging Canadians to join them in a national boycott.



Lucien Royer, Action Canada Network



We will ask Canadians to look at the bottom of paper bags and find the Daishowa logo and to approach merchants across the country to encourage them to join the boycott.



Boguski



Daishowa is a giant international pulp and paper company. It operates a plant near Peace River and lays claim to 40,000 square kilometres of trees in northern Alberta, timber land right in the heart of the Lubicons' traditional hunting territory, land the Lubicons say is theirs.



Royer



The federal government is responsible to negotiate, but the federal government doesn't listen to Indians. The federal government doesn't listen to Albertans. The federal government doesn't listen to Canadians. Our intent is to put pressure on Daishowa because the federal government will listen to Daishowa.



Reporter



Because money talks?



Royer



Money talks.



Boguski



The Lubicon have been trying to negotiate a land claim settlement with the federal government since 1939, a dispute that's dragged on for more than 50 years. But the Vice President of Daishowa says that's not his problem.



Tom Hamaoka, Vice-President, Daishowa Canada



We're being portrayed as villains in this dispute which we're powerless to resolve.



Boguski



Hamaoka says the national boycott of Daishowa products won't hurt his company because 95% of his products are sold in Japan. But he warns this action could backfire.



Hamaoka



This boycott could potentially be counter-productive from the point of view of investors wanting to invest in northern Alberta and by virtue of this we could all lose, we could all be hurt, not only Daishowa but the Lubicons, the Province and the communities of northern Alberta.



Boguski



Daishowa says it's trying not to inflame the situation by staying out of the disputed land and logging elsewhere, at least for this logging season. But that's little consolation to these Lubicon supporters who see Daishowa as the villain and plan to make the company pay. The Lubicon supporters say they'll be spending the next few weeks finding out which companies are using Daishowa products and then urging them to stop. If they don't, the Lubicon supporters warn those business might become the target of demonstrations like the one today. Rick Boguski, CBC News, Edmonton.


Attachment #42: Transcript of ITV News Broadcast (10:00 P.M.) Tuesday, December 17, 1991



Ross McLaughlin, ITV News



There's no let-up in the efforts to block construction of the Daishowa pulp mill. Supporters of the Lubicon Band staged demonstrations in Calgary and Edmonton today and security and police were on hand to make sure things did not get out of control. Kathy Tomlinson reports.



Kathy Tomlinson, ITV News



For a while, it appeared the protest had the desired effect. Security blocked the entrance to Daishowa's head office while Lubicon supporters made their position clear.



Barry Johnstone, Alberta Environmental Alliance



Their situation is desperate. It's tragic. And we think it's outrageous.



Fred Lennarson, Lubicon Advisor



The Lubicon people really believe, and a number of Lubicon people have said to me personally, "If they come in and take our trees on top of everything else, we might as well lie down and die; we are finished as a people."



Tomlinson



But Edmonton Centre is private property, so the protest was short-lived. And no one was allowed up to Daishowa offices.



Security Staff



They don't want you in there. You've been asked to leave the building. You'll be arrested if you don't leave.



Protestor



We have to leave right now? Can't we go up and talk to them?



Tomlinson



The protestors say Daishowa is one of the Lubicon enemies. They expect the company will log on traditional Lubicon land before the Band can negotiate its land settlement with Ottawa. But upstairs Daishowa tells a different story...



Tom Hamaoka, Vice President, Daishowa Canada



The Lubicons and the Friends of the Lubicons have created a well-orchestrated media campaign aimed at targeting Daishowa.



Tomlinson



Mr. Hamaoka says a boycott will only hurt the northern Alberta economy. It could shelve Daishowa's plans to build a paper plant next to the mill.



Hamaoka



We're being portrayed as villains in this dispute, which we're powerless to resolve.



Tomlinson



The company has no plans to log in Lubicon territory this winter. Meantime, another part of the Lubicon drama is unfolding in Peace River. A Band member faces a preliminary court hearing charged with arson. He's one of 13 members accused of torching logging equipment near the mill last winter. The Lubicon lawyer wants to subpoena Premier Don Getty and the Prime Minister as part of the defence. Kathy Tomlinson, ITV News.



McLaughlin



Land claim negotiations between the Band and the government are supposed to start up again this February. They've been stalled for almost 3 years.


Attachment #43: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Wednesday, December 18, 1991



LUBICON SUPPORTERS PUBLICIZE BOYCOTT

DEMONSTRATORS DENIED ACCESS TO DAISHOWA OFFICES IN DOWNTOWN TOWER



Paul Marck

Journal Staff Writer

Edmonton



About 50 placard-waving Lubicon supporters noisily demonstrated Tuesday after they were barred access to the downtown offices of Daishowa Canada.



Curious shoppers and onlookers gathered near the Royal Trust tower at Edmonton Centre as Barry Johnstone, chairman of the Alberta Environmental Alliance, announced the expansion of a boycott of Daishowa paper products to Alberta.



The boycott supports the Lubicon band's land claim in northern Alberta.



"Now by targeting Daishowa for a major boycott effort, we'll use the market force of consumer preference to allow ordinary people to have their say, to voice their concerns about the environment, to voice their concerns about Daishowa," Johnstone said.



Daishowa, with a pulp mill and two sawmills at Peace River, has a forestry management agreement with the province to log a vast tract of public land east of Peace River that takes in disputed Lubicon territories.



The company has agreed to stay off disputed lands this winter. Lubicon supporters want the giant Japanese company to stay out until the federal government reaches a land-claim settlement with the band.



Daishowa has failed to negotiate in good faith with the Lubicon, Johnstone claimed.



The Action Canada Network, which lobbied against the free-trade agreement and the GST, backs the boycott.



Spokesman Lucien Royer said Alberta Lubicon supporters want the public to examine retail paper bags for the stylized Daishowa logo on the bottom and ask retailers to stop using them.



The group plans to monitor Daishowa products and later apply pressure on retailers by picketing them if they fail to stop using the products.



"If we find that merchants refuse to join the boycott, we will be starting a slow series of rotating pickets to inform Canadians that the merchants are not joining the boycott," Royer said.



The demonstration, attended by about 50 placard-waving supporters, got unruly when a security man barred access to the office tower and Daishowa's fifteenth-floor offices.



Building operations manager Allen Baptist of Oxford Development called police after he asked demonstrators to move outside. A dozen officers responded, but the demonstration broke up after participants sang a few choruses of Daishowa Go Home to the popular hockey chant, Na-Na-Hey-Hey Goodbye.



Others trying to get into the office tower were turned away for about 50 minutes. A courier demanded to be let in claiming he had mortgage papers that needed signing. Other businessmen complained loudly they had meetings to go to and planes to catch.



Laurel Charbonneau, who manages the W.H. Smith bookstore adjacent to where the demonstration took place, said the goings-on hurt business.



"Look around you. Do you see any shoppers in here? It's the week before Christmas," she said.


Attachment #44: December 18, 1991, ACTION ALERT from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)



Dear Friends:



Season's Greetings! Since embarking on the Daishowa boycott campaign in early November, we have been encouraged by many successes. Organizations which support the boycott include the Assembly of First Nations, the National Association of Japanese Canadians the Native Women's Association and the Action Canada network. Businesses which have supported the boycott by cancelling their Daishowa paper contracts include Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants, Knechtel's Wholesale Grocers (of Kitchener), Ho-Lee-Chow and The Body Shop.



Daishowa has said publicly that the boycott is hurting them economically. In fact, Daishowa was instrumental in pressuring Indian Affairs Minister Tom Siddon to organize a meeting for early February 1992 that will include Chief Ominayak and Dick Fowler, the Alberta minister responsible for Native Affairs. On Saturday, December 14, Chief Ominayak met with the mayor of Peace River and members of the business community. They asked Chief Ominayak to end the boycott because Daishowa is "an innocent third party". Rejecting the characterization of Daishowa as an innocent third party, Chief Ominayak said the boycott will continue until Daishowa makes a clear, public and unequivocal commitment, in writing, to stay out of Lubicon territory until a land rights settlement is negotiated, and until the wildlife and environmental concerns of the Lubicon are met.



The Lubicon attribute this sudden increased interest in their land rights struggle to the boycott and are asking their supporters to continue to turn up the heat on Daishowa by continuing the boycott.



One company which has refused to support the boycott is Pizza Pizza. In fact, Pizza Pizza has stated publicly that they support Daishowa in their negotiations with the Lubicon. Pizza Pizza has refused a meeting with Friends of the Lubicon to discuss the issue and has ignored an open letter which asked them to review their position on ethical and moral grounds. Two leafleting demonstrations have failed to persuade Pizza Pizza to do the right thing.



As a result, Friends of the Lubicon is asking Lubicon supporters to phone 967-1111 on New Year's Eve (traditionally one of their busiest times) to express concern over Pizza Pizza's decision to support Daishowa. On the phone:



  1. express your solidarity with the Lubicon Lake Nation
  2. insist that Pizza Pizza stop buying Daishowa paper bags
  3. let them know you won't order from Pizza Pizza until they do so
  4. be polite but firm. The operator is probably overworked and underpaid!
  5. phone back during the course of the evening. Get your friends to call too.


It seems Pizza Pizza will not give in until it becomes an economic necessity. Please help spread the word about the Pizza Pizza boycott over the holiday season.



The next meeting of Friends of the Lubicon is scheduled for 7:00 pm on January 7, 1992, at the Native Canadian Centre, 16 Spadina Road, Toronto. Items to be discussed include Pizza Pizza, as well as Country Style Donuts and The Added Touch, two other companies which have yet to support the boycott. If you have any questions please call. Don't forget to phone Pizza Pizza on New Year's Eve, and tell all your friends to get their pizzas somewhere else!


Attachment #45: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Wednesday, December 18, 1991

Letter to the Editor from Daishowa Vice-President Tom Hamaoka



DAISHOWA REBUTS LETTER'S CLAIMS



Kevin Thomas, with Friends of the Lubicon in Toronto, claims (Daishowa has ethical obligation to Lubicons, Letters, Dec. 2) that Daishowa Canada made an agreement with the Lubicons on March 7, 1988, "not to cut on unceded Lubicon lands until a settlement of their land rights had been negotiated."



Thomas also states that Daishowa has been inconsistent in its denials that such an agreement exists.



On the contrary, Daishowa has clearly stated that an agreement respecting the "unceded Lubicon lands" was never made at the March 7, 1988, meeting or at any other time. Daishowa has acknowledged, however, that it gave assurances to refrain from logging in the reserve area negotiated between Premier Don Getty and Chief Bernard Ominayak in late 1988 (the Grimshaw accord), and this reserve area was eventually excluded from Daishowa's forest management agreement in 1989.



Our assurances cannot, of course, apply to independent companies, some of which the Lubicons have falsely claimed are also Daishowa subsidiaries.



Daishowa certainly recognizes that the Lubicons and their supporters would desire a more extensive agreement from Daishowa, but they should not falsely claim that one was made in 1988. In fact, Ominayak wrote to Daishowa on April 2, 1988, and said "we failed to communicate adequately during our meeting" on March 7.



Notwithstanding the absence of a formal written or verbal agreement to restrict its activities, Daishowa has demonstrated its sensitivity to this issue by modifying its logging plans last winter and not logging in the area of concern to the Lubicons this winter.



We hope that our actions will provide the Lubicons and the federal government with an opportunity to settle their dispute, and we urge both sides to resume their negotiations.


Attachment #46: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Monday, January 6, 1992

Letter to the Editor from Kevin Thomas, Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)



DAISHOWA EXECUTIVE SKIRTS MAIN ISSUE



In his letter, Daishowa rebuts letter's claims (Dec. 18), Daishowa General Manager Tom Hamaoka skirts the central issue of whether clear-cutting unceded aboriginal lands is right or wrong, in favor of a misleading and essentially irrelevant tirade concerning Daishowa's original commitment not to log in unceded Lubicon territories.



Whether or not Daishowa has already made and broken an agreement not to log in Lubicon territories -- something about which few who've followed this situation have any doubt -- Daishowa does plan to clear-cut unceded aboriginal territories, and thus is a direct threat to the Lubicon nation's survival.



In this situation the only ethical position to take is to stay out of unceded territories until a land rights settlement is reached.



Resource development cannot be pursued at the expense of an entire culture and the lands it occupies.



Daishowa only delayed its plans to clear-cut these territories for this winter after it became clear that it would face a national boycott campaign should it proceed.



The firm's single motivating factor was not "sensitivity to this issue", as Hamaoka contends, but the fear of negative publicity.



In the face of that self-interest, it seems that only continuation and growth of the national boycott campaign will convince Daishowa to make the responsible decision not to cut, or buy wood cut, in unceded Lubicon territories until a land rights settlement is reached with both levels of government.


Attachment #47: WINDSPEAKER, December 20, 1991



DAISHOWA: THE WEST SIDE STORY



By Cooper Langford



Daishowa's massive pulp mill in northern Alberta sits on the west side of the Peace River. On the east are the Lubicon who don't want the company or its related businesses logging on their traditional land -- at least until the band's land claim is settled.



Relations between the band and the corporation have never been easy. The Lubicon are using Daishowa as a pressure point to drive home their need for a claim. Daishowa says it tries to accommodate Lubicon concerns while living up to other obligations.



Now the dispute is taking a new twist. Lubicon supporters have launched a national boycott of Daishowa products. Daishowa has returned fire with the public line that warns Albertans against Lubicon protests. The company says it sympathizes with the band, but too much protest could scare off future investment in northern Alberta and hurt a lot of people.



Against this backdrop, Windspeaker met with Daishowa Canada's vice-president Tom hamaoka to discuss the company's side of the story.



WAS: This morning there were protestors outside your offices proclaiming a national boycott of Daishowa products. How's business?



Hamaoka: Business is as usual. The boycott has had a negative affect on our employees. But it hasn't had a substantial negative effect on our operations economically. I think our concern is we're being painted as villains in a dispute we are powerless to resolve.



WAS: Your critics are demanding you stay off Lubicon land. Are you or your sub-contractors logging Lubicon land?



Hamaoka: We would like to know exactly what are Lubicon lands. It's in our best interest to have that particular area defined. Yes we are logging in the confines of the traditional areas. We are not logging in the reserve are which was negotiated between Bernard Ominayak and Premier Getty. That portion has been excluded from our forest management agreement.



WAS: You have made a commitment not to log or buy wood from Lubicon land this winter. Would you explain that?



Hamaoka: We asked the province for and were given a release from our obligations to purchase wood from area sawmill owners and independent loggers.



WAS: You had to ask the province? Does that mean you can't refuse to buy wood or log the disputed land?



Hamaoka: As Daishowa we cannot unilaterally give a definite commitment not to log without receiving approval form the province of Alberta...Under our current arrangement we are obligated to purchase incidental aspen from independent operators who work in the area. Their permits say they must harvest the aspen and leave it at roadside. We are obligated to purchase that timber. This year we received permission from the province releasing us from this obligation.



WAS: Can you go back and renegotiate your obligations to buy wood from the disputed area again?



Hamaoka: Daishowa would be prepared to seek an extension as long as it contributed to settling the Lubicon claim. But again, you know, approvals are required from the government.



WAS: The Lubicons say you promised not to log in the unceded area in a meeting in March 1988. That was before your forestry agreement was signed. Can you explain what happened at the meeting?



Hamaoka: That's not correct. Our undertaking was not to log on the reserve near Lubicon Lake and Little Buffalo. That was our undertaking. We have abided by that.



WAS: But Lubicon records quote a Mr. Wakabayashi from Daishowa saying if the land is in dispute, then Daishowa "shouldn't pursue the area at all." Is this not a commitment?



Hamaoka: First of all, Mr. Wakabayashi is not an employee of Daishowa Canada. He was speaking about building the mill. We asked Bernard Ominayak where the areas of concern were. They were on the east side of the Peace River. We asked that question because our pulp mill was being built on the west side of the river. The Lubicon said they were not concerned with the west side of the river. The comment was meant in that context.



WAS: So there was no commitment not to cut on Lubicon land in 1988?



Hamaoka: That's correct.



WAS: Either way, you were aware of the Lubicon situation before you signed your forestry agreements?



Hamaoka: Yes.



WAS: In that case, why did you sign the agreement?



Hamaoka: We negotiated in good faith with the Alberta government, who assured us the crown had the rights to the land and the timber. We signed the agreement on that basis.



WAS: Didn't your meetings with the Lubicon cause you to doubt the province's assurances?



Hamaoka: Our understanding at that time was the Lubicon and both levels of government were in process of negotiations. We were hopeful this land claim would be resolved...There were discussions throughout the winter of 1989 between the Lubicons and the governments. We signed our forest management agreement in September 1989. Negotiations were ongoing at that time. Negotiations stopped, is my understanding, after Christmas of 1989.



(NOTE: Negotiations broke down in January of 1989 and have yet to resume.)



WAS: Wasn't it clear at that time there were troubles with the Lubicon settlement over finances?



Hamaoka: That is something we are powerless to resolve. That was an issue for the Lubicon and the federal government. We knew they were far apart. However, at the beginning they were even farther apart. They did bridge the gap somewhat during that time.



WAS: Were you expecting Lubicon opposition would become as strong as it has?



Hamaoka: I have to say honestly -- no.



WAS: So a lot of what has happened over the last three years is a surprise to the company?



Hamaoka: Yes, it is.



WAS: Were you misled by the government in respect to the Lubicon situation? They did try to dissuade you from meeting with the band.



Hamaoka: That was when negotiations were underway. I believe the province felt aboriginal land claims were the responsibility of the federal government. Clearly, they had jurisdiction provincially. They had lived up to their particular commitments and the rest was up to the federal government.



WAS: Did the province indicate to you that the process might bog down?



Hamaoka: No. They did not.



WAS: Do you think they should have?



Hamaoka: At that particular time I don't know if anyone would have expected the talks to break down. We're talking about hindsight. Everybody has 20-20 hindsight. You can go back and criticize. But at that time I think there was an honest feeling by all parties the matter could be resolved.



WAS: Have you since considered renegotiating for forest agreements to avoid confrontation with Lubicon?



Hamaoka: No...Once the land claim is resolved, I think there are going to be opportunities for the Lubicon to work within the framework of our agreement. We are currently working with other aboriginal groups in our logging sector, maintenance and training.



WAS: So you have no interest in moving your timber leases away from the disputed areas?



Hamaoka: I think the priority should be on settling. I don't think moving our agreement is going to have any impact on the settlement of this claim. The issue of the land has already been resolved in terms of the reserve. The current logging conflict has been diffused. The outstanding matter is compensation. Is it not?



WAS: We're thinking about business. Surely what is happening can be good for business?



Hamaoka: There's no question. That's one of my greatest concerns. This particular boycott could be counter-productive to future investment in northern Alberta. The boycott is going to hurt future investments. That's going to hurt us all.



WAS: Future investments by Daishowa?



Hamaoka: Not only Daishowa. Investors, whether they're local or foreign, like to invest in a climate that's secure and stable. The boycott is counter-productive in this respect.



WAS: Daishowa has indicated a strong interest in expanding into papermaking here. Are those plans endangered now?



Hamaoka: Only to the extent that we are in an economic recession and the market for pulp and paper products worldwide is depressed. But I am optimistic for the long term.



WAS: The politics don't interfere with other phases of your work?



Hamaoka: I would hope that before we proceed this land claim is settled.



WAS: Daishowa has said it's caught in the middle of a dispute between governments and Indians. Could you explain this position?



Hamaoka: I feel we've really been sensitive to the Lubicon situation. As early as last year we modified our Brewster operations so as not to log in new land in the sensitive area. This year we also demonstrated sensitivity by persuading the province to release us from particular obligations. We are not logging or purchasing timber in the sensitive area. We urged both levels of government to step in and recommence the negotiations. I don't know what else Daishowa can do.



WAS: You have weight with the government. Can't you go back and say this is not what we dealt for?



Hamaoka: Daishowa is an honorable company. We signed an agreement in good faith. We have obligations. Not only to the Lubicon, but also to other aboriginal communities surrounding Peace River. We can't look at one group in isolation. I think you have to look at the total picture in trying to reach a decision of that serious nature.



WAS: But you have the strength to play hard ball with the provincial government?



Hamaoka: With respect to the provincial government, logging is not an issue. We are not logging there. However, the Lubicon are allowing other people to log within the sensitive area. So clearly, the issue is not land base related. The issue is compensation. And Daishowa is powerless to exert pressure or resolve compensation issues.



WAS: But the province is interested in having you here and keeping you here. Doesn't that give you leverage?



Hamaoka: We paid our own way. We did receive some infrastructure assistance, but that was general assistance to open up the north for development. There are no loan guarantees. There are no participating debentures. There are no low interest loans. I'm elated that we were one of the pioneers in northern Alberta. To be able to diversify the province of Alberta. I think that the economic benefits that we have given to northern Alberta really contribute to its development.



WAS: Can we take that to mean you don't want to play the kind of hardball your critics would like to see you play?



Hamaoka: My personal view and from an industry perspective is that private corporations have responsibilities. However I don't think those responsibilities extend to participating in negotiations to resolve aboriginal land claims.



WAS: Then can Daishowa deal directly with the Lubicon on development issues?



Hamaoka: We want to work with the Lubicon. I would like that clearly understood. We have had discussions in the early stages with Bernard Ominayak with respect to exploring economic opportunities within the Peace River project. We've been able to achieve this with other aboriginal groups within the framework of the existing agreement we have. I feel that we can work to establish closer ties with the Lubicon within the existing framework. But the claim issue I think should be resolved.



WAS: We're all aware of the speculation that Daishowa is looking to sell the mill or seek new investment. You are facing a boycott. There is a lot of bad publicity. Is there a point where you are going to simply cut your losses?



Hamaoka: You've asked three questions. Let me respond. First, at no time was the mill for sale. We were approached by a company we work within B.C. They had an interest in working together with us in Alberta. Those talks have now discontinued. It's business as usual for Daishowa. We are here for the long haul. We feel that our investment in northern Alberta, the pulp mill itself and the potential to further integrate forward into paper, has a bright long-term future.


Attachment #48: December 24, 1991, letter from Calgary Committee Against Racism to Vice-President of Daishowa Tom Hamaoka



Mr. Hamaoka:



This letter is to inform you that several groups in Calgary have joined forces to support the Lubicon Lake Indian Nation, and help protect the fragile northern eco-system. These groups are the Calgary Labour Council, the Calgary Rainforest Action Group, the Committee Against Racism, Northern Light, and the Plains Indian Cultural Survival School.



We are both well aware that your refusal to honour your commitment of March 7, 1988, may result in a likely disastrous showdown with the Lubicon people.



We are also both well aware that you are able to turn this situation around by honouring the commitment of March 7, 1988.



And we are both well aware that if Daishowa does not honour its commitment of March 7, 1988, Daishowa will be an active participant in government-sponsored and government-encouraged genocide to once and for all get rid of the Lubicon Lake Indian society.



We therefore ask you to make a clear, firm and public commitment to not cut and not to purchase any wood cut on unceded Lubicon territory until AFTER A SETTLEMENT of Lubicon land rights and negotiation of a harvesting agreement with the Lubicon people that takes into account Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. We are also calling on Daishowa to immediately cease all of its clearcutting and purchasing of trees from the Wood Buffalo National Park and to implement sustainable forestry practices in all of its FMA areas.



Roland Leitner


Attachment #49: December 28, 1991, letter to Friends of the Lubicon from Romolo John Salvati, Ex-employee of Pizza Pizza Ltd.



Dear Friends of the Lubicon,



I am writing to re-affirm my unequivocal support for your organization's National Boycott of Daishowa Paper Products. Employed as a Switchboard operator by Pizza Pizza, I find our company's callous affirmation in maintaining continued relations with Daishowa Company to be downright insensitive toward the ongoing plight of the Lubicon Cree in Alberta.



Approaching this particular matter within Manager Evelyn Page, my essential question posed to her was: why "really" is Pizza Pizza adamant in supporting Daishowa Products? She confessed in secret confidence: "We had gone to extreme length to negotiate a "very profitable" business deal with Daishowa Company, realistically speaking thence, it would be foolish to jeopardize this arrangement based on "flimsy" ideological protesting."



Shocked and dismayed at this point in time, I had stated to Ms. Page that while her organization reaps the benefits based on one Company's (Daishowa) systematic attempt to obliterate a "true" and legitimate tribe, I find participation with that company to be unconscionable and quite pathetic to say the least. Therefore, in support of the Friends of the Lubicon Tribe, I had offered my immediate resignation.



In retrospect, I feel this "act of protest" is minuscule in comparison to the time and energy your organization has devoted to the ongoing struggle to preserve the Inalienable Rights of a down-trodden people. Nevertheless, in so far as my sudden resignation had raised eyebrows and altered the awareness in the working environment to a "different" level, I feel my obligatory duty was just worthy. My wish is that more Canadians alike take on an aggressive and active stance against the blatant violations committed against our Native Peoples in Canada. Furthermore, I hope (and pray) that these "Precious People" do not inevitably become matters of "trivialization", nor mere footnotes glanced over by our future generations.


Attachment #50: December 29, 1991, News Release from Friends of the Lubicon (Toronto)



WILL PIZZA PIZZA MAKE A NEW YEAR'S COMMITMENT TO SUPPORT THE LUBICON LAKE CREE NATION?



Hoping for an answer in the affirmative, Lubicon supporters have resolved to flood Pizza Pizza's central phone lines (967-1111) on New Year's Eve (Dec. 31) with calls proffering New Year's greetings coupled with appeals in the spirit of the season to boycott Daishowa paper products.



Yes, to this date, Pizza Pizza has remained stuck in the old pattern of using Daishowa paper bags despite the boycott called on these products by Friends of the Lubicon. We hope that Pizza Pizza will consider making a New Year's resolution which will make the next year a good one for the Lubicon Nation.



The Lubicons want the transnational paper company Daishowa to make a commitment not to cut or buy wood cut on unceded Lubicon territories in northern Alberta until a land rights settlement is reached with both levels of government and a harvesting agreement negotiated with their Nation. A New Year's resolution on Pizza Pizza's part to boycott Daishowa products would bring good cheer to all Lubicons and their supporters, and would be in keeping with the traditional seasonal imperative to cast off old ways and make a fresh, better start.



Once again, we are pleased to announce the intention of Lubicon supporters to partake in what promises to be a busy, festive evening of dialogue.



Season's Greetings to all!



For more information, contact Kevin Thomas at 972-6293.


Attachment #51: ALBERTA NATIVE NEWS, December, 1991



DAISHOWA BOYCOTT WORKING



By Dale Stelter



The Lubicon Lake Indian Nation of northern Alberta is waging a nation-wide boycott of products of Daishowa paper products, and Daishowa has publicly admitted that it is feeling the pressure.



The boycott is in response to the refusal of Daishowa Canada to adhere to a March, 1988, agreement between the company and the Lubicon. Under that agreement, Daishowa is not to log on unceded Lubicon land until a settlement of the Lubicon's land rights dispute is obtained, and an agreement is reached regarding Lubicon environmental and wildlife concern.s



Daishowa Canada, a subsidiary of the transnational Daishowa Paper Manufacturing Company of Japan, has only stated that it will not log on disputed land this winter. Last winter, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Daishowa Canada, as well as a subcontractor with Daishowa, began clear-cutting operations on traditional Lubicon land.



The Lubicon have been involved in a 50-year-plus land rights dispute, and maintain that they have never ceded Aboriginal rights to their traditional territory. The Forest Management Agreement between Daishowa Canada -- which operates a huge bleached kraft pulp mill near the town of Peace River -- and the Alberta government encompasses all of the Lubicon's traditional lands, excluding a proposed reserve.



The Daishowa boycott is supported by the Assembly of First Nations and the National Association of Japanese Canadians, and companies have been agreeing to stop buying Daishowa products.



For example, a representative of Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants wrote to the Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon -- which is organizing many boycott activities -- that "After careful research into the current situation in Alberta, Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants has decided to stop using Daishowa products". Cultures operates 61 soup and sandwich style restaurants in Canada.



A buyer/merchandiser with Knechtel Wholesale Grocers wrote that "I have had time to read both sides of the problem and I have to side with The Friends of the Lubicon."



Ho-Lee-Chow Restaurants, which is based in Toronto and has a chain of 23 restaurants, wrote that it has "already switched our business to a supplier which does not utilize Daishowa Products."



The Y.W.C.A. in Toronto was in the process of tendering for paper contracts when contacted by the Friends of the Lubicon, and decided not to buy Daishowa's paper.



If companies continue to use Daishowa products, Friends of the Lubicon maintain that they too will be boycotted.



Lubicon Chief Bernard Ominayak agreed that many people are becoming aware of the Daishowa boycott and are supporting it. "Hopefully, more people will understand what is happening to the Lubicon people, and also question why governments are pouring money into these types of pulp mills, which are outdated and a hazard to all of society," he said.



Ominayak added that "we certainly appreciate all of the work that the Friends of the Lubicon are doing."



Meanwhile, international efforts in support of the Lubicon continue. A Germany-based group called Big Mountain Aktionsgruppe e.V. reported that a mailing action to European support groups was conducted as part of the STOP DAISHOWA CAMPAIGN, and that Friends of the Earth England and Wales have expressed their wish to join the campaign.



In Australia, The Wilderness Society has called upon the Australian government to "exert international pressure on the environmental and social policies of Daishowa Seishi, whose forestry operations have prompted a worldwide plea for help from the Lubicon Indian Nation of Canada."


Attachment #52: NIKKEI VOICE, December 1991/January 1992



BOYCOTTING DAISHOWA



OTTAWA:



A national call for action to boycott Daishowa paper products was announced at a press conference organized by the Friends of the Lubicon, and the National Association of Japanese Canadians committed its support to the cause. Sachiko Okuda, Chair of the Human Rights Committee of NAJC stated that this position reflects the grave concern that the NAJC has over the environment consequences that clear cutting operations represent. But of even more importance, she said, is the long-term, destructive effects that such actions will have on the Lubicons themselves and their very existence as people.



At the press conference the following businesses were identified as still using Daishowa paper products: Pizza Pizza, Mr. Submarine, Country Style Donuts, Zehrs and the Liquor Control Board of Ontario. YWCA in Toronto and The Body Shop, and Cultures Fresh Food Restaurants, Ho-Lee-Chow and Knetchel's Grocery Wholesalers will follow suit. It was pointed out that boycotts do work. The boycott of the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics and its art exhibit, "The Spirit Sings" by the Lubicon became a major public issue and resulted in worldwide support for the Lubicons and a major blow for the exhibition.


Attachment #53: NIKKEI VOICE, December 1991/January 1992, Letter to the Editor from Jesse Nishihata



CROSSING THE LUBICON



December 7, 1991, marks the fiftieth anniversary of Pearl Harbor. And we remember that racism, made legitimate by the political institutions, "scattered us far and wide", and that is is only now with the winning of redress that we are truly and finally "calling our people home". Is it too late?



And then there is 1992. It will be the 500th anniversary of Columbus and his "discovery" of the New World. Thomas Berger, in A LONG AND TERRIBLE SHADOW, White Values, Native Rights in America, 1492-1992, writes:



The history that we will celebrate in 1992 is the history of progress we have made. That progress has been made at the expense of the Indians; for them that history is one of suffering, of massacre, disease and devastation. Europe has cast a long and terrible shadow over the Native people of the New World. Today they are emerging from beneath that shadow, and they have a tale to tell not only of subjugation but also of survival, for they still live among us, and they have a claim on our consciences, a claim that we should honour the principles by which we profess to live.



How to listen to that tale and to be with it. And when in Canada today that issue can be joined with the struggle of the Lubicon Indians of Alberta whose continued tragic story is now shadowed by the presence of Daishowa, a Japanese global conglomerate, on their lands. Can we not join? And when we join that struggle can we not honour those principles by which we profess to live and through which we fought and struggled to gain redress? Yes! So that finally with Miranda we can cry out:



O wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here!

How beauteous mankind is!

O brave new world, that has such people in't!



And was that ever the promise of the Americas and of Canada!


Attachment #54: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Thursday, January 2, 1992



DAISHOWA BOYCOTT IN SUPPORT OF LUBICONS DEEMED MISDIRECTED

DOESN'T HELP LAND-CLAIM ISSUE, MINISTER SAYS



Joan Crockatt

Journal Staff Writer

Edmonton



The boycott of Daishowa Inc. in support of the Lubicon Indians' land claim is "stupid" says Alberta Forestry Minister LeRoy Fjordbotten.



The Lubicon have a claim on land currently under a provincial forestry lease to the pulp-and-paper giant.



Fjordbotten said the boycott is misdirected.



"I don't see any advantage to targeting Daishowa. The only reason it's being done is they (the protestors) think they're a big company they have a lot of political leverage and that might help their cause," Fjordbotten said.



"I think that's a stupid way to go about things," he told Standard Broadcast News.



"If someone comes to me and says you do this or else, I'll always take the or else.



"I don't think you should be threatened. And I don't think we need to threaten each other in order to resolve issues."



He said Daishowa can't resolve the issue.



It's up to the federal government and the Lubicon, said Fjordbotten, pointing out that the company has already agreed not to log the territory in dispute.



Daishowa general manager Tom Hamaoka, of Vancouver, in a Dec. 18 letter to THE JOURNAL confirmed Daishowa "gave assurances to refrain from logging in the reserve area negotiated between Premier Don Getty and (Lubicon) Chief Bernard Ominayak in late 1988 (the Grimshaw accord), and this reserve area was eventually excluded from Daishowa's forest-management agreement in 1989."



"Notwithstanding the absence of a formal written or verbal agreement to restrict its activities, Daishowa had demonstrated its sensitivity to this issue by modifying its logging plans last winter and not logging in the area of concern to the Lubicons this winter," Hamaoka added.



Nonetheless, on Nov. 28 Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon launched a national boycott against Daishowa's products.



Lubicon adviser Fred Lennarson said lobby efforts against Daishowa have been extended to Japan, Switzerland, Germany, France and Australia.



The 500-member Lubicon Lake band has tried unsuccessfully to settle a land claim with the federal government for more than 50 years. The band was omitted from turn-of-the-century negotiations that settled other native land claims in northern Alberta.



It accepted an offer of 246 square km for a reserve at Lubicon Lake, 350 km northwest of Edmonton, but rejected the federal government's January 1989 offer of $45 million in compensation.



The band wants $170 million.



Talks are scheduled for February.



Lennarson has said he suspects Indian Affairs of conducting a propaganda campaign, trying to show sincerity while "hammering the Lubicons" into accepting the previous offer.



But Alberta Indian Affairs Minister Dick Fowler maintains the Lubicon have been offered a more handsome settlement than any other Alberta band.


Attachment #55: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Friday, January 3, 1992



EDITORIAL

A NOT-SO-STUPID BOYCOTT



If Forestry Minister LeRoy Fjordbotten believes the boycott of Daishowa Inc. is merely stupid, he's one of a scant few. The company's executives don't think so, and neither do those Canadians who are upset enough at the failure of governments to resolve the Lubicon land claim that they refuse to buy the pulp and paper company's products.



In fact, it can be argued that the boycott, launched six weeks ago by a Toronto-based environmental group, has played a large role in resparking negotiations to settle the long-standing land claim.



Whether boycotts really dent a company's bottom line is debatable. But Daishowa Vice-President Tom Hamaoka says the protest has hurt sales enough that he has asked Ottawa to get involved in the talks, which it appears ready to do.



The only thing stupid about that is that it didn't happen earlier.



Still, Fjordbotten was quoted this week as saying the boycott is simple-minded because people don't respond well to threats. "The only reason it's being done is they (the protestors) think they're a big company, they have a lot of political leverage and that might help their cause," he said.



"I think that's a stupid way to go about things. If someone comes to me and says you do this or else, I'll take the 'or else'."



Obviously, Daishowa disagrees, because taking the "or else" would mean further negative publicity.



Fjordbotten's remarks also insult consumers who have stopped buying Daishowa products in a good-faith effort to bring this long dispute to a close.



In late 1988, Premier Don Getty and Lubicon Lake Chief Bernard Ominayak defied the odds and signed an agreement offering the band a 246 square-kilometre reserve.



Rather than stoop to childish name-calling, Fjordbotten might try to conjure up some of that goodwill. He might even try to get some of it to rub off on the government's federal cousins, who have been so instrumental in stalling an honorable settlement with the Lubicons.



It would be the smart thing to do.


Attachment #56: THE EDMONTON SUN, Tuesday, January 7, 1992, Letter to the Editor from Gray Jones, Western Canada Wilderness Committee



RE: REBUTTAL to letter to the editor, EDMONTON SUN, Dec. 19, 1991 by James P. Morrison, G.M. Daishowa Canada Ltd.



Wood Buffalo National Park is a place of international ecological significance, recognized by the UN as having the same World Heritage Site status as the Grand Canyon. As in the case of logging in traditional Lubicon territory, where Daishowa is hiding behind subcontractors like Brewster and Buchanan, Daishowa is operating through a front company called Canadian Forest Products Ltd. Also like Brewster and Buchanan in the Lubicon case, CanFor is taking most of the environmental and media backlash while Daishowa is getting the timber. The way Daishowa is avoiding responsibility for its actions this time is by purchasing CanFor's Alberta operations last spring on the condition that the CanFor name be retained on the existing timber lease. That way Daishowa was able to circumvent normally required renegotiation of the lucrative but environmentally destructive timber lease negotiated earlier by CanFor. CanFor is perceived as the villain, logging in a Canadian national park, while slick Daishowa pockets economic benefits from some of the last old-growth stands of white spruce in the province of Alberta and a winter-heat canopy for the wood buffalo herd living there.



Gray Jones, Western Canada Wilderness Committee



(Edmonton Sun Note: Daishowa does only what Albertans permit it to.)


Attachment #57: From Phantom X Press, January 7, 1992



IS IT CRUST OR CARDBOARD?



Reliable sources have it that Daishowa pulp is a key ingredient in Pizza Pizza dough. Early last week, results from a double blind consumer survey prompted speculations leading to the startling revelation. In the taste test, a surprising number of the Pizza Pizza patrons could not tell the difference between the Pizza Pizza crust and the cardboard box.



Daishowa President of Vice Tom NotmyOka denied the allegation: while Daishowa GM Fork Tongue Morrison refused to comment on the question but added that "our pulp passes the recently proposed Health and Welfare limits for dioxin levels in food." Pizza Pizza spokesman Forlorn Laustinspace related his own trap like grasp of the matter saying, "Uh, I don't understand what's the problem and I wish people would stop picking on us." Ironically, the Jan. 1, 1994 federal dioxin ban for the pulp and paper industry may make a pulp mill effluent less toxic than some of the food we eat.



Can you see it now? Grocery store queues clamouring for Daishowa water Dioxin-free. Imagine any cocktail party without the great white water of the north 'Eau de Abitibi', Faux-pas incroyable!



Yikes!


Attachment #58: January 8, 1992, letter from NOW Magazine to Daishowa Forest Products



Dear Mr. Kitagawa:



NOW recently purchased Daishowa's brown paper shopping bags for our Christmas promotional campaign.



We have since been distressed to learn that Daishowa is permitting and profiting from lumbering operations on land claimed by the Lubicon Nation of Alberta, despite Lubicon opposition.



This is unacceptable to us and millions of other Canadians who take native rights very seriously. Accordingly, NOW magazine will not buy any more Daishowa products until the Lubicon claim is resolved. I trust you will advise your head office of the serious damage done to your reputation in Canada by operations prejudicial to the vital interests of native people.



Regards, Alice Klein, Executive Editor, NOW magazine


Attachment #59: THE EDMONTON SUN, Thursday, January 9, 1992



FOREST FIGHTS THREATEN JOBS

SOLUTIONS NEEDED, DAISHOWA WARNS



Stories by Allan Bolstad

Staff Writer



Hundreds of forestry workers will be tossed out of work unless quick solutions are found to logging disputes in northern Alberta, says Daishowa Canada's general manager.



Tom Hamaoka told THE EDMONTON SUN's editorial board yesterday that 200 jobs at its subsidiary Brewster Construction Ltd. will be lost if it is unable to replace wood supplies claimed by the Lubicon Indian Band in the Peace River area.



And in High Level, the jobs of 250 lumber plant workers and 450 woodland employees are in jeopardy if Daishowa's subsidiary Canadian Forest Products Ltd. is forced to quit logging in Wood Buffalo National Park.



At Peace River, Hamaoka said his company has agreed not to touch a 243-sq.-km area identified as "traditional" by the Lubicons during this year's logging season, which is expected to conclude at the end of February.



"But I don't know how long we can continue to do this.



"What are we supposed to do if there are no supplies?"



Although Daishowa has been awarded logging rights in the area under dispute, Hamaoka said his firm has tried to stay out of the fray, believing it was a matter between the band and the Alberta and Canadian governments.



But some bad press and a recent boycott of some of its products have forced Daishowa to come forward, he explained.



"The boycott had been negative on our employees (and has affected) our credibility internationally."



Hamaoka said he was also concerned about the impact it could have on investment in Alberta.



But he was optimistic a solution could be reached at talks the Lubicons have scheduled with Ottawa in February.



"It's going to involve compromise...by the provincial government, by the federal government, by the Lubicons and to some extent, it might affect Daishowa."



At High Level, Hamaoka said his firm wanted help retooling its lumber plant so that it could handle trees smaller than the large white spruce it was taking in Wood Buffalo.



He said Ottawa has yet to make an offer.



Daishowa is also losing money at its $575-million Peace River mill, he said.



But recent hikes in the price of pulp, coupled with low interest rates, have prompted the firm to drop all plans of selling any portion of the plant, he said.


Attachment #60: THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, Thursday, January 9, 1992



DAISHOWA EXPANSION STALLS

LUBICON CLAIM AND PULP GLUT CITED AMONG REASONS



Duncan Thorne

Journal Staff Writer

Edmonton



Daishowa Canada won't meet a 1993 construction deadline for doubling its Peace River pulp mill, citing the stalled Lubicon land claim as one main reason.



But Daishowa's Japanese parent company has decided to retain full ownership of the $600-million mill, closing the doors to a possible joint-venture deal with a Japanese controlled trading company, says Canadian general manager Tom Hamaoka.



Meanwhile, an international boycott of Daishowa products, in support of the Lubicon, is wrongly tarnishing the company's name, Hamaoka told THE JOURNAL's editorial board Wednesday.



He said the expansion is on hold partly because of the Lubicon dispute and because of a global pulp glut and uncertain public support.



"My first priority is to really have this Lubicon matter resolved before we consider any future investments in North America," he said.



He said the company can delay and still live with the terms of its provincial forest management agreement, which calls for construction to start next year.



The agreement deadline is subject to economic, social and environmental considerations, Hamaoka said.



If not for the Lubicon issue, the recession and other concerns, "we'd be working towards the feasibility study right now."



Doubling the capacity will probably cost at least $700 million because of inflation, he said. The company also has longer-range plans for a $350-million paper mill.



Henry Wakabayashi, a senior management consultant for Daishowa, said Daishowa is still developing international markets for its relatively new hardwood pulp and will see the Alberta-Pacific project competing for the same buyers.



"The market has to be there before anybody will spend $700-$800 million," Wakabayashi said.



Hamaoka wouldn't say if the expansion will go ahead by the mid-1990s. He said changes in government approval systems add to uncertainty on timing.



It's no longer good enough to have government support, he added. "The public has to also want it."



Hamaoka sought the meeting with THE JOURNAL to give Daishowa's side on the boycott, breaking with its 20-year history in Canada of remaining what he termed "low-profile."



"We can't sit by and see our name being tarnished when in fact it shouldn't be," he told the board.



Toronto-based Friends of the Lubicon launched the boycott in November to support the band's bid for a claim settlement with Ottawa. The group said Daishowa has failed to commit itself not to log Lubicon lands.



Hamaoka said he wonders if the national organizers are ore interested in shutting down the mill than in helping the Lubicon.



He said he and band Chief Bernard Ominayak agreed in 1988 on acceptable logging territory. He also got Ominayak's approval before removing logs, cut by independent firms, from disputed land.



Daishowa can't give a commitment never to log Lubicon lands because the size of the land remains unclear, he said.



He said the main issue is federal cash compensation, not logging, as other loggers and oil and natural gas firms continue to operate within the "sensitive" areas.


Attachment #61: January 09, 1992, letter from Chief Bernard Ominayak to the Editor of THE EDMONTON JOURNAL



Dear Sir/Madam:



It was fascinating to read the January 9th article on the meeting between Daishowa Vice President Tom Hamaoka and the Editorial Board of the Edmonton Journal. One never knows what new twists and turns Mr. Hamaoka's going to come up with in his efforts to rationalize his company's obviously continuing intention to clear-cut unceded Lubicon lands.



Mr. Hamaoka claimed that he asked for the meeting with the Editorial Board because Daishowa "can't sit by and see our name being tarnished" by the Lubicon boycott of Daishowa paper products. It's a little late for Mr. Hamaoka to start worrying about Daishowa's good name. Long before Daishowa threatened to clear-cut unceded Lubicon territory, or in fact proceeded to clear-cut Wood Buffalo National Park, it had one of the worst international reputations of any of the huge Japanese forestry companies.



Mr. Hamaoka suggested that the organizers of the Lubicon boycott are more interested in shutting down Daishowa's bleached kraft Peace River Pulp Mill than helping the Lubicons. We don't consider these objectives to be mutually exclusive. While shutting down the Peace River mill isn't our priority -- our priority is to block the clear-cutting of our unceded traditional territory -- we acknowledge that many of the people supporting our boycott are justifiably concerned about the environmental damage caused by the bleached kraft pulp-making process. We share those concerns.



Mr. Hamaoka said that "he and I agreed in 1988 on acceptable logging territory". That's true only by implication. What we agreed in 1988 was that Daishowa would stay out of the unceded Lubicon territory until there was first a settlement of Lubicon land rights negotiated between the Lubicons and the Government of Canada and then a harvesting agreement negotiated between Daishowa and the Lubicons respecting Lubicon wildlife and environmental concerns. In this context Mr. Hamaoka could legitimately argue that we effectively agreed Daishowa could log elsewhere, but it is certainly not true, as he implies, that we ever agreed Daishowa could log anywhere within our unceded traditional territory.



Mr. Hamaoka said that he obtained our "approval" before removing logs cut by independent loggers from our unceded traditional territory. That's true but again only in a certain context. These so-called "independent loggers" started clear-cutting our trees for Daishowa's Peace River Mill last fall, contrary to our 1988 agreement with Daishowa. One night last November their logging camp was torched and they hastily vacated the area, leaving behind the timber which they'd already cut and stacked in piles. Last summer they asked for our permission to remove that already cut and stacked timber, which we granted on the understanding that no more timber would be cut.



Mr. Hamaoka said that Daishowa can't make a commitment to stay out of our unceded traditional territory "because the size of the land remains unclear". That's not true and Mr. Hamaoka knows it. As part of our 1988 agreement Daishowa requested and received a map outlining the area of concern. The boundaries of that area were reconfirmed last fall during discussions involving independent loggers who'd been falsely told by Daishowa -- for reasons known only to Daishowa -- that the Lubicons are asserting jurisdiction over an area much larger than the actual area.



Lastly Mr. Hamaoka said that "the main issue is federal cash compensation, not logging, as other loggers and oil and natural gas firms continue to operate" in our area. That's not true either. Gas and oil companies operating in our unceded traditional territory without our authorization are subject at any time to exactly the same proscriptions as Daishowa, and there are no other logging companies known to be logging in our area -- only in the much larger area which Daishowa for some reason insists on claiming on our behalf.


Attachment #62: THE GLOBE AND MAIL, Friday, January 10, 1992



DEADLINE MISSED



Daishowa Canada won't meet a 1993 construction deadline for doubling its Peace River pulp mill, citing stalled land-claim negotiations with the Lubicon Indians as a key factor.



But Daishowa's Japanese parent company has decided to retain full ownership of the $600-million mill, closing the doors to a possible joint-venture with a Japanese-controlled trading company, said Canadian general manager Tom Hamaoka.



He said the expansion is on hold, partly because of the Lubicon dispute and because of a global pulp glut and uncertain public support.



"My first priority is to really have this Lubicon matter resolved before we consider any future investments in North America."


Attachment #63: (Direct Translation from German)



BIG MOUNTAIN ACTION GROUP PRESS RELEASE

January 13, 1992





We demand the resumption of negotiations between the Canadian government and the Lubicon Cree on the next possible date and without Federal Government preconditions.



We demand the temporary annulment of the timber leases to Daishowa illegally issued by the Provincial Government and simultaneously a public declaration of abstention by the Daishowa company to clear-cut the Lubicon territory.



To give some emphasis to our demands the European support organizations will join the boycott efforts of our Canadian partners. We appeal to the German, Belgian, Dutch and other European customers of Daishowa and its subsidiaries like the Canfor Corporation to re-evaluate their supply policies and act accordingly.



We appeal especially to Feldmuhle AG located here in Dusseldorf to end the cooperation with partners whose giant projects would not only have the consequence of Human Rights violations towards Canadian natives but also the destruction of environment in dimensions only comparable to the neighbouring Province of British Columbia or the South American rainforest.





Further information on this issue available at:



Big Mountain Aktionsgruppe e.V.

Klenzestr. 5

8000 Munchen 5

Tel.: 089/2913027

Fax : 089/2913039